Welcome to my Réti Opening (ECO A04) ICC online game with tooslow page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the Réti Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams.

[Event “ICC 30 0”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2005.03.19”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “tooslow”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ICCResult “White resigns”]
[WhiteElo “1593”]
[BlackElo “1447”]
[Opening “Réti opening”]
[ECO “A04”]
[NIC “QP.11”]
[Time “16:03:15”]
[TimeControl “1800+0”]

 

  1. Nf3 d6 2. g3 e5 3. d3 h6 4. Bg2 c6 5. O-O Nf6 6. e4 Be7 7. Nbd2 Nh7 8. h4 O-O 9. Nh2 Na6 10. f4 exf4 11. gxf4 Bxh4 12. f5 Qf6 13. Qg4 Qg5 14. Ndf3 Qxg4 15. Nxg4 Bg5 16. Bxg5 Nxg5 17. Nxg5 hxg5 18. c3 f6 19. d4 Kf7 20. Bf3 Nc7 21. Kg2 Bd7 22. Rh1 Rh8 23. Rxh8 Rxh8 24. Rh1 Rxh1 25. Kxh1 g6 26. fxg6+ Kxg6 27. Kg2 Be6 28. a3 f5 29. exf5+ Kxf5 30. Kg3 Bd5 31. Bxd5 Nxd5 32. Kf3 Nf6 33. Ne3+ Ke6 34. c4 d5 35. c5 Kf7 36. Nf5 Ne8 37. Kg4 Kg6 38. Nd6 Nxd6 39. cxd6 Kf6 40. d7 Ke7 41. Kxg5 Kxd7 42. Kf6 Kd6 43. Kf5 c5 44. dxc5+ Kxc5 45. Kf4 d4 46. Ke4 Kc4 47. a4 Kb4 48. Kxd4 Kxa4 49. Kc4 b5+ 50. Kc3 b4+ 51. Kc2 a5 52. Kb1 Kb3 53. Ka1 a4 54. Kb1 Kc4 55. Kc2 Kd4 56. Kc1 Kd3 57. Kb1 Kd2 58. Ka2 b3+ 59. Kb1 Kd3 60. Kc1 Kc4 61. Kb1 Kb4 62. Kc1 a3 63. bxa3+ Kxa3 64. Kb1 b2 65. Kc2 Ka2 {White resigns} 0-1

Online Game
ICC
White: Mike Serovey (1593) Black: tooslow (1447)

1. Nf3 d6 2. g3 e5 3. d3 h6

Réti Opening after 3... h6

Réti Opening after 3… h6

I rarely see h6 on the third move. Black wants to keep the White Knight and Bishop off g5.

4. Bg2 c6 5. O-O

Réti Opening after 5. 0-0.

Réti Opening after 5. 0-0.

White’s position can easily transpose into a King’s Indian Attack or an English Opening.

Nf6 6. e4 Be7 7. Nbd2 Nh7 8. h4 O-O

Réti Opening after 8... 0-0.

Réti Opening after 8… 0-0.

White is preparing for, and Black is trying to prevent, a Kingside attack.

9.Nh2 Na6 10. f4? (loses a pawn) exf4 11. gxf4 Bxh4

Réti Opening after 11... Bxh4.

Réti Opening after 11… Bxh4.

White lost a pawn here and remains down this pawn throughout the rest of the game. This pawn turns out to be a deciding factor in the endgame.

12. f5 Qf6 13. Qg4 Qg5

Réti Opening after 13... Qg5.

Réti Opening after 13… Qg5.

Black wants to trade queens because he is up material and trading takes some pressure off his King’s position. White’s next move obliges while double attacking Black’s Queen with minor pieces. White gains in development by this trade.

14. Ndf3 Qxg4 15. Nxg4 Bg5 16. Bxg5 Nxg5

Réti Opening after 16... Nxg5.

Réti Opening after 16… Nxg5.

The queens are now off the board and we are transitioning from the opening to the middle game. White has a slight lead in development and a better pawn structure to compensate for his lost pawn.

17. Nxg5 hxg5 18. c3 f6

Réti Opening after 18... f6.

Réti Opening after 18… f6.

Black is still up a pawn but now it is doubled. One of the doubled Kingside pawns is passed, though, so Black has the advantage. White is best to keep his King or Knight in front of that passed pawn.

19. d4 Kf7 20. Bf3 Nc7 21. Kg2 Bd7 22. Rh1 Rh8

Réti Opening after 22... Rh8.

Réti Opening after 22… Rh8.

Black and White both want control of the open h file. White must trade rooks to keep Black from controlling this file.

23. Rxh8 Rxh8 24. Rh1 Rxh1 25. Kxh1 g6!

Réti Opening after 25... g6!

Réti Opening after 25… g6!

Black now gets to undouble his pawn and try to take advantage of his passed g pawn.

26. fxg6+ Kxg6 27. Kg2 Be6 28. a3 f5

Réti Opening after 28... f5.

Réti Opening after 28… f5.

Black is forcing the exchange of his Kingside pawns to take advantage of his passed g pawn. Possible here is 29. Ne3 fxe4 30. Bxe4+ Kh5 31. Kg3 and Black’s Kingside advance is stopped for now. Or, Black can play 29… g4? 30. exf5+ Bxf5 31. Nxf5 Kxf5 32. Bxg4+ and White has his pawn back and the Bishop versus Knight endgame.

29. exf5+ Kxf5 30. Kg3 Bd5 31. Bxd5 Nxd5

Réti Opening after 31... Nxd5.

Réti Opening after 31… Nxd5.

White is playing for a draw here while Black is playing for the win. White’s plan is to keep the Black King away from his pawns and to trade off pawns on the Queenside and then sacrifice his Knight for the g pawn leaving Black with insufficient material to mate.

32. Kf3 Nf6 33. Ne3+ Ke6

Réti Opening after 33... Ke6.

Réti Opening after 33… Ke6.

White has accomplished one of his objectives, the Black King is now away from the White pawns.

34. c4 d5 35. c5 Kf7 36. Nf5 Ne8 37. Kg4 Kg6

Réti Opening after 37... Kg6.

Réti Opening after 37… Kg6.

White has temporarily stopped the advance of the Black g pawn and has kept the Black King on the Kingside of the board. However, White still needs to trade off those Queenside pawns to get a draw.

38. Nd6?! Nxd6

Réti Opening after 38... Nxd6.

Réti Opening after 38… Nxd6.

White creates a passed d pawn, which he trades for Black’s g pawn.

39. cxd6 Kf6 40. d7 Ke7 41. Kxg5 Kxd7

Réti Opening after 41... Kxd7.

Réti Opening after 41… Kxd7.

Now we have a King and Pawn endgame. White is still down a pawn and has two pawn islands versus Black’s one. Black is better here. White hopes to trade down into a drawn endgame where he has the opposition when facing the lone Black pawn.

42. Kf6 Kd6 43. Kf5 c5 44. dxc5+ Kxc5 45. Kf4 d4

Réti Opening after 45... d4.

Réti Opening after 45… d4.

Here is where White blows his drawing chances. Instead of 46. Ke4? White should play 46. b3! keeping Black’s King away from his Queenside pawns. If 46… d3? 47. Ke3! winds the d pawn and should draw. If Black plays 46… b5 then 47. Ke4 b4 48. a4 a5 49. Kd3 Kd5 and White may have a chance to draw this one.

46. Ke4 Kc4

Réti Opening after 46... Kc4.

Réti Opening after 46… Kc4.

After this White still has drawing chances. White manages to overcome all errors until move 63.

47. a4 Kb4 48. Kxd4 Kxa4 49. Kc4 b5+

Réti Opening after 49... b5+

Réti Opening after 49… b5+

White does manage to get his King in front of Black’s pawns, and stays in the corner, but is forced out eventually.

50. Kc3 b4+ 51. Kc2 a5 52. Kb1 Kb3

Réti Opening after 52... Kb3.

Réti Opening after 52… Kb3.

White should be able to draw just by moving his King back and forth between a1 and b1, but it fails to work out that way.

53. Ka1 a4 54. Kb1 Kc4 55. Kc2 Kd4 56. Kc1 Kd3 57. Kb1 Kd2 58. Ka2 b3+ 59. Kb1 Kd3 60. Kc1 Kc4 61. Kb1 Kb4 62. Kc1 a3

Réti Opening after 62... a3.

Réti Opening after 62… a3.

Here is where White lost the endgame! instead of capturing on a3 White should move his King to b1. Play here should continue 63. Kb1! If 63… a2+? 64. Ka1 stalemate. If instead Black plays 63… axb2 then 64. Kxb2 Kx4 65. Kb1 Kc3 66. Kc1 b2 67. Kb1 Kb3 stalemate. And finally, if 63… Ka4 then 64. Ka1 and White moves back and forth on a1 and b1 until Black accepts the draw or captures on b2. This is just another example of my playing too quickly and not looking at all of my moves and all of my opponents moves. I had a draw up to this point!

63. bxa3+ Kxa3 64. Kb1 b2 65. Kc2 Ka2 0-1

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