Welcome to my Réti Opening (ECO A09) ICC online game with homecomputeraid page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the Réti Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. I clearly outplayed my opponent in the opening and middle game, but got careless in the endgame and gave my opponent a draw by stalemate.

[Event “ICC 15 10”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2005.05.23”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “homecomputeraid”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ICCResult “Black stalemated”]
[WhiteElo “1533”]
[BlackElo “1420”]
[Opening “Réti opening”]
[ECO “A09”]
[NIC “QP.09”]
[Time “00:37:44”]
[TimeControl “900+10”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 Nf6 3. g3 Bg4 4. Bg2 e6 5. O-O Nbd7 6. b3 Bd6 7. Ba3 O-O 8.
Bxd6 cxd6 9. d3 dxc4 10. bxc4 Rc8 11. h3 Bf5 12. Nd4 Bg6 13. Bxb7 Rc7 14.
Bg2 Ne5 15. Nc3 a6 16. Qa4 Nxd3 17. exd3 Bxd3 18. Rfd1 Bxc4 19. Nc6 Qe8 20.
Qxc4 d5 21. Qxa6 Rxc6 22. Qd3 Qc8 23. Ne2 Qc7 24. a4 Rb8 25. a5 Nd7 26. a6
Ra8 27. Rdb1 Nc5 28. Qb5 Rcxa6 29. Rxa6 Nxa6 30. Qb7 Qd8 31. Nd4 Nc5 32. Qb6
Qxb6 33. Rxb6 Ra1+ 34. Kh2 g6 35. Rc6 Nd3 36. f4 Ne1 37. Bf3 Ra2+ 38. Kg1
Nd3 39. Nxe6 fxe6 40. Rxe6 Ra1+ 41. Kg2 Ne1+ 42. Kf2 Nxf3 43. Kxf3 Ra3+ 44.
Kg4 d4 45. Rd6 d3 46. h4 h5+ 47. Kh3 Kg7 48. Kg2 Ra2+ 49. Kf3 d2 50. Ke3 Kf7
51. Rxd2 Rxd2 52. Kxd2 Kf6 53. Ke3 Kf5 54. Kf3 Kf6 55. g4 hxg4+ 56. Kxg4 Kg7
57. h5 gxh5+ 58. Kxh5 Kf6 59. Kg4 Kg6 60. f5+ Kf6 61. Kf4 Kf7 62. Kg5 Kg7
63. f6+ Kf7 64. Kf5 Kg8 65. Ke6 Kf8 66. Ke5 Kf7 67. Kf5 Kf8 68. Kg6 Kg8 69.
f7+ Kf8 70. Kf6 {Black stalemated} 1/2-1/2

Online Game #115

ICC
White: Mike Serovey (1533) Black:
Ted LeRoy (1420)

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 Nf6 3. g3 Bg4 4. Bg2 e6 5. O-O Nbd7

Réti Opening after 5... Nbd7.

Réti Opening after 5… Nbd7.

In the Réti opening, Black often plays d5 and White leaves the c pawn hanging until he can no longer recapture it by playing Qa4+. This position is fairly typical of games where I played the Réti. Once I need to protect the c pawn then I usually play b3.

6. b3 Bd6 7. Ba3

Réti Opening after 7. Ba3.

Réti Opening after 7. Ba3.

I usually wait until Black has moved his King’s Bishop to play my Bishop to a3, thus forcing Black to move the move the dark-squared Bishop twice if he captures on a3, or to protect the King’s Bishop. Black castled here allowing me to double his pawns in the Center.

O-O 8.Bxd6 cxd6 9. d3 dxc4 10. bxc4 Rc8

Réti Opening after 10... Rc8.

Réti Opening after 10… Rc8.

Black has completed his development and has a solid position. White needs to complete his development but, chooses to kick the light-squared Bishop and try to capture it instead. A pawn is worth 3 tempos in the opening so White is justified in delaying the development of the Queen’s Knight in order to capture Black’s b pawn.

11. h3 Bf5 12. Nd4 Bg6 13. Bxb7 Rc7

Réti Opening after 13... Rc7.

Réti Opening after 13… Rc7.

White is now up a pawn and needs to move his Bishop on b7 out of danger and then move his Knight on b1 to a better square.

14. Bg2 Ne5 15. Nc3 a6

Réti Opening after 15... a6.

Réti Opening after 15… a6.

It is interesting to note that all 4 Knights are lined up on the same diagonal. White is up a pawn and has now completed his development. Black’s last move was to keep the White knights off b5.

16. Qa4 (Attacking Black’s a pawn) Nxd3!?

Réti Opening after 16... Nxd3!?

Réti Opening after 16… Nxd3!?

Black gets three pawns for his Knight and the Bishop ends up protecting the a pawn. Also, the Black Rook ends up putting pressure on White’s Knight at c3.

17. exd3 Bxd3 18. Rfd1 Bxc4

Réti Opening after 18... Bxc4.

Réti Opening after 18… Bxc4.

Black has two pawns for a Knight and a passed pawn in the Center. White now wins the Bishop on c4.

19. Nc6! Qe8 20.Qxc4 d5 21. Qxa6 Rxc6

Réti Opening after 21... Rxc6.

Réti Opening after 21… Rxc6.

White has an extra Bishop and Black has an extra pawn. White’s passed a pawn is better than Black’s passed d pawn because in the endgame White’s King can get to the d pawn faster than Black’s King can get to the a pawn. Also, Rooks belong behind passed pawns and White already has a Rook behind his a pawn.

22. Qd3 Qc8 23. Ne2 Qc7

Réti Opening after 23... Qc7.

Réti Opening after 23… Qc7.

White is better here. Black has his Queen and Rook doubled on c file when they should be supporting the advance of his d pawn. White is blocking the advance of Black’s d pawn with his Queen and Rook. Because passed pawns must be pushed White chooses this time to advance his a pawn.

24. a4 Rb8 25. a5 Nd7 26. a6 Ra8 27. Rdb1 Nc5

Réti Opening after 27... Nc5.

Réti Opening after 27… Nc5.

White is advancing his a pawn in the hopes of either queening it or forcing Black to sacrifice a piece to stop it from queening. The Black Knight on c5 is trying to win White’s a pawn.

28. Qb5 Rcxa6 29. Rxa6 Nxa6

Réti Opening after 29... Nxa6.

Réti Opening after 29… Nxa6.

If Black had captured on a6 with his Rook instead of his Knight then White would have played 30. Qb8+ Qxb8 31. Rxb8# mating the Black King.

30. Qb7 (Trading Queens is to White’s advantage because White is up material.) Qd8 (Black is wise to avoid trading Queens right now.) 31. Nd4?

Réti Opening after 31. Nd4?

Réti Opening after 31. Nd4?

I gave this move a question mark because it drops the exchange after 31… Rb8 32. Rxa6 Rxb1+. Better was 31. Ra1 threatening to win the Knight on a6. After 31. Ra1 Nc7 32. Rxa8 Qxa8 33. Qxa8 Nxa8 White is slightly better.

Nc5? 32. Qb6 Qxb6 33. Rxb6 Ra1+

Réti Opening after 33... Ra1+

Réti Opening after 33… Ra1+

White is threatening to checkmate on b8 but Black gets his check in first. White is still up a Bishop for two pawns. The White knight is blockading Black’s passed d pawn and White can easily get his Rook behind that passed pawn.

34. Kh2 g6 35. Rc6 Nd3 36. f4 Ne1

Réti Opening after 36... Ne1.

Réti Opening after 36… Ne1.

Black is trying to win White’s Bishop. White is OK with trading for the Black Knight because he is still up material. White still has the check on c8 but, it is no longer checkmate.

37. Bf3 Ra2+ 38. Kg1 Nd3 39. Nxe6!?

Réti Opening after 39. Nxe6!?

Réti Opening after 39. Nxe6!?

White decided here to give back the extra material by trading his Knight for two pawns and then targeting the now isolated d pawn.

fxe6 40. Rxe6 Ra1+

Réti Opening after 40... Ra1+

Réti Opening after 40… Ra1+

Black is playing for a checkmate on the White King and White is trying to win the isolated d pawn. I believe White to be slightly better here.

41. Kg2 Ne1+ 42. Kf2 Nxf3 43. Kxf3 Ra3+

Réti Opening after 43... Ra3+

Réti Opening after 43… Ra3+

Now, we have a typical Rook and Pawn endgame. Black has a passed pawn but it is isolated. White has a Kingside pawn majority. The Black King is temporarily cut off from the isolated d pawn while White’s King is centralized. Even if White does win the d pawn there is still no guarantee of a win.

44. Kg4 d4 45. Rd6 d3

Réti Opening after 45... d3.

Réti Opening after 45… d3.

This is a key position for White. White’s King is safe for now and he has his Rook behind Black’s passed pawn, which is  exactly where Black’s Rook should be! As long as White can keep the Black King away from his passed pawn and avoid Rook checks after the Black pawn reaches d2, then Black can never queen the pawn without losing it immediately  afterwards.

46. h4 h5+ 47. Kh3 Kg7

Réti Opening after 47... Kg7.

Réti Opening after 47… Kg7.

The white Rook is attacking pawns on d3 and g6. Black’s Rook, on the other hand, is guarding the d pawn and putting a little pressure on White’s King. White needs to bring his King back to the Center.

48. Kg2 Ra2+ 49. Kf3 d2 50. Ke3 Kf7

Réti Opening after 50... Kf7.

Réti Opening after 50… Kf7.

White now wins the isolated d pawn. The game is far from over, though.

51. Rxd2 Rxd2 52. Kxd2 Kf6

Réti Opening after 52... Kf6.

Réti Opening after 52… Kf6.

Now, we have a simple King and Pawn endgame with White up a pawn on the Kingside. Again, this game is far from over.

53. Ke3 Kf5 54. Kf3 Kf6 55. g4 hxg4+ 56. Kxg4 Kg7

Réti Opening after 56... Kg7.

Réti Opening after 56… Kg7.

White needs to trade his h pawn for the Black g pawn and then get the opposition in order to queen the f pawn. Black plays this correctly and the game ends in a draw.

57. h5 gxh5+ 58. Kxh5 Kf6 59. Kg4 Kg6

Réti Opening after 59... Kg6.

Réti Opening after 59… Kg6.

It is White’s turn to move here. If it was Black’s turn to move then White would have the opposition and a win.

60. f5+ Kf6 61. Kf4 Kf7 62. Kg5 Kg7 63. f6+ Kf7 64. Kf5 Kg8

Réti Opening after 64... Kg8.

Réti Opening after 64… Kg8.

White has the opposition now but plays the King to the wrong square and gives it back to Black!  Play should have continued 65. Kg6! Kf8 66. f7 Ke7 67.Kg7 and Black cannot stop White from queening the pawn.

65. Ke6 Kf8 66. Ke5 Kf7 67. Kf5 Kf8 68. Kg6 Kg8 69. f7+ Kf8 70. Kf6 1/2-1/2

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