Welcome to my Réti Opening (ECO A04) ICC online game with DeMarco page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the Réti Opening

This game includes analysis and diagrams. This game is one of many chess games that I have played on the Internet Chess Club’s (ICC) site. ICC is a place where I can play against human players from all over the world and also against some chess programs.

[Event “ICC 20 20”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2005.05.08”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “DeMarco”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ICCResult “Black resigns”]
[WhiteElo “1538”]
[BlackElo “1141”]
[Opening “Réti opening”]
[ECO “A04”]
[NIC “QP.10”]
[Time “23:25:15”]
[TimeControl “1200+20”]

1. Nf3 c5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. O-O d5 5. d3 h6 6. c4 d4 7. a3 a5 8. Nbd2
e5 9. b3 Bd6 10. Bb2 O-O 11. Ne1 Bd7 12. Nc2 Qc8 13. Re1 Bh3 14. Bh1 Qf5 15.
Ne4 Nxe4 16. Bxe4 Qd7 17. e3 f5 18. Bd5+ Kh8 19. exd4 e4 20. dxe4 Bg4 21. f3
Bh3 22. e5 Bc7 23. dxc5 Ne7 24. Bxb7 Rab8 25. Qxd7 {Black resigns} 1-0

Online Game #115
ICC
White: Mike Serovey (1538) Black: DeMarco (1141)

1. Nf3 c5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. O-O d5 5. d3 h6

 

Réti Opening after 5... h6.

Réti Opening after 5… h6.

Here White has a choice of playing 6. c4 going into a English type position or playing e4 going into a King’s Indian Attack type position. White chose the former.

6. c4 d4

Réti Opening after 6... d4.

Réti Opening after 6… d4.

Now, White wants to transpose into a Reversed Benko Gambit, but Black thwarts that idea.

7. a3 a5 8. Nbd2 e5 9. b3 Bd6 10. Bb2

Réti Opening after 10. Bb2.

Réti Opening after 10. Bb2.

White has all of his pieces developed while Black is lagging behind a little in development. White has the position that he wants, almost. White wants to trade off the a and b pawns and then attack on the Queenside. White continues to deploy his pieces as if playing the Benko Gambit.

O-O 11. Ne1 Bd7 12. Nc2 Qc8

Réti Opening after 12... Qc8.

Réti Opening after 12… Qc8.

Black wants to play Bh3 forcing the exchange of bishops and weakening the light squares around the White King. White sees this and prevents the exchange.

13. Re1 Bh3 14. Bh1 Qf5

Réti Opening after  14... Qf5.

Réti Opening after 14… Qf5.

Black is putting pressure of f2 trying to force the exchange of light-squared bishops or win material if White defends incorrectly.

15. Ne4 Nxe4 16. Bxe4 Qd7

Réti Opening after 16... Qd7.

Réti Opening after 16… Qd7.

White has stopped Black’s attack on f2 and can now open up the Center. Black still attacks on the Kingside, though.

17. e3 f5 18. Bd5+ Kh8 19. exd4 e4 20. dxe4

Réti Opening after 20. dxe4.

Réti Opening after 20. dxe4.

White is up 2 pawns here and simply needs to just survive Black’s Kingside attack to win the endgame. Black’s play is less than accurate here.

Bg4 21. f3 Bh3 22. e5!

Réti Opening after 22. e5!

Réti Opening after 22. e5!

White is still up two pawns here and now has a passed pawn in the Center.

Bc7? (e7 is better as it protects the pawn on c5 and blocks the passed e pawn.) 23. dxc5 Ne7?

Réti Opening after 23... Ne7?

Réti Opening after 23… Ne7?

White is now up 3 pawns and Black has just dropped a fourth. I still do not understand why some people will play out lost positions all the way to checkmate!

24. Bxb7 Rab8?? 25. Qxd7!! 1-0

Réti Opening after 25. Qxd7!! (Final position).

Réti Opening after 25. Qxd7!! (Final position).

White is now up a Queen and 4 pawns!

Mike Serovey, MA, MISM

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