Welcome to my Pirc Defense game (ECO B06) with Surebus page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the Black side of the Pirc Defense.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. Towards the end of this game my opponent was down 4 passed pawns! Instead of resigning like a gentleman he let the game sit idle until the system forfeited him on time! The ratings listed below are for each player at the end of this game. If I remember correctly, I won this event.

[Event “Game 435036; Tournament: Numerical Analysis; Match: H”]
[Site “Stan’s NetChess”]
[Date “2008.06.03”]
[Round “?”]
[White “surebus”]
[Black “mserovey”]
[Result “0-1”]

1. e4 d6 2. d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. Nb5 Nxe4 6. Qf3 Nf6 7. Bg5 c6 8. Nc3
O-O 9. Bxf6 Bxf6 10. O-O-O d5 11. Bb3 e5 12. Nge2 Re8 13. Kb1 exd4 14. Nxd4 Na6
15. g4 Nc5 16. h3 a5 17. a4 Ra6 18. Rd2 Rb6 19. Qd1 Bxd4 20. Rxd4 Nxb3 21. cxb3
Qf6 22. Rd2 Qf4 23. Ne2 Qxf2 24. Nd4 Qg3 25. Qc2 Bd7 26. Rd3 Re3 27. Rxe3 Qxe3
28. Qc5 Rb4 29. Rd1 Qxh3 30. Qxa5 Qxg4 31. Qxb4 Qxd1+ 32. Ka2 Bh3 33. Qb6 h5 34.
a5 Bf1 35. Ka3 Qa1+ 36. Kb4 Qxb2 37. Kc5 Qc3+ 38. Kd6 Kg7 0-1

Game 435036; Tournament: Numerical Analysis; Match: H
Stan’s Net Chess
Game Ended: 2 October 2008
White: Surebus (2055) Black: Mike Serovey (2224)

 1. e4 d6 2. d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. Nb5?

Pirc Defense after 5. Nb5?

Pirc Defense after 5. Nb5?

This is the first of several mistakes that surebus made in this game. I asked him why he made that move and he thought I was being sarcastic when I was serious. He never did answer my question. It is easy to win when your opponent hands you free pawns like this! This game is a good example of how not to play against the Pirc Defense.

Nxe4 6. Qf3 Nf6 7. Bg5 c6 8. Nc3 O-O 9. Bxf6 Bxf6 10. O-O-O d5 11. Bb3 e5

Pirc Defense after 11... e5.

Pirc Defense after 11… e5.

Black is up a pawn. Although both sides need to complete their development Black decided here to open up the Center a bit.

12. Nge2 Re8 13. Kb1 exd4 14. Nxd4 Na6 15. g4 Nc5

Pirc Defense after 15... Nc5.

Pirc Defense after 15… Nc5.

Normally, Black would not move this Knight twice until after his Queen’s Bishop had moved. Here Black wants to remove one of the pieces guarding White’s King.

16. h3 a5 17. a4 Ra6 18. Rd2 Rb6 19. Qd1 Bxd4!

Pirc Defense after 19... Bxd4!

Pirc Defense after 19… Bxd4!

Although exchanging pieces on d4 weakens the dark squares around the Black King, White can’t take advantage of this because all of his pieces are on the Queenside and because he no longer has a dark-squared Bishop. White will end up with doubled pawns on the b file which will weaken his King’s position some.

20. Rxd4 Nxb3 21. cxb3 Qf6 22. Rd2 Qf4 23. Ne2?

Pirc Defense after 23. Ne2?

Pirc Defense after 23. Ne2?

This is the second blunder of a pawn! Black’s threat was 23… Qb4 winning the pawn on b3. White can now put his Knight on c1 in order to protect b3 but he loses the pawn at f2!

Qxf2 24. Nd4 Qg3 25. Qc2 Bd7 26. Rd3 Re3

Pirc Defense after 26... Re3.

Pirc Defense after 26… Re3.

Black is up 2 pawns so of course he wants to trade down into a won endgame!

27. Rxe3 Qxe3 28. Qc5 Rb4 29. Rd1 Qxh3 30. Qxa5 Qxg4 31. Qxb4 Qxd1+

Pirc Defense after 31... Qxd1+

Pirc Defense after 31… Qxd1+

Black is now up 3 pawns and has 4 passed pawns. White should resign now because he has no chance of holding a draw down this many pawns!

32. Ka2 Bh3 33. Qb6 h5

Pirc Defense after 33... h5.

Pirc Defense after 33… h5.

White can’t grab the pawn at b7 because he would lose his Knight at d4. The Knight has no place that it can safely move to. So, Black can just start advancing his passed pawns on the Kingside. White now advances his a pawn in hopes of undermining Black’s Queenside.

34. a5 Bf1

Pirc Defense after 34... Bf1.

Pirc Defense after 34… Bf1.

Black played 34… Bf1 in order to discourage 35. a6 but the pawn advance is still playable. After 36. a6 bxa6 37. Nxc6 Black still has his 4 passed pawns but now his d pawn and a pawn are isolated. White’s doubled pawns on the b file are pretty much useless. But, White can trade the pawn at b3 for the one at a6 and then advance his last pawn in for a Queen. However, Black would queen first and still have more pawns that can be queened.

35. Ka3 Qa1+ 36. Kb4 Qxb2

Pirc Defense after 36... Qxb2.

Pirc Defense after 36… Qxb2.

Now Black is up 4 passed pawns and White still refuses to resign! White can still push his pawn to a6 because then the Knight can capture on c6. Instead, he moves his King a couple of times and then forfeits on time.

37. Kc5 Qc3+ 38. Kd6 Kg7 0-1

Pirc Defense after 38... Kg7 (Final position).

Pirc Defense after 38… Kg7 (Final position).

Play could have continued with 39. Kc7 h4 40. Kxb7 h3 41. Nxc6 h2 42. a6 Bxa6+ 43. Kxa6 h1=Q and White has a Knight versus a Queen and 2 passed pawns.

Back to the Pirc Defense Page