Welcome to my Pirc Defense game with Comet page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the Black side of the Pirc Defense.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. The ratings listed below are for each player at the end of this game.

[Event “Game 451713”]
[Site “Stan’s NetChess”]
[Date “2009.02.02”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Comet”]
[Black “mserovey”]
[Result “0-1”]

[1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d6 3. e4 c6 4. Nf3 Qa5 5. Bd2 Bg4 6. Nd5 Qd8 7. Nxf6+ gxf6 8.
Be2 Nd7 9. h3 Bh5 10. Nh4 Bxe2 11. Qxe2 Qb6 12. Bc3 e6 13. d5 O-O-O 14. dxe6
fxe6 15. O-O-O d5 16. exd5 cxd5 17. Bd4 Bc5 18. c3 Kb8 19. Bxf6 Nxf6 20. b4 Bxb4
21. cxb4 Qxb4 22. Qe5+ Ka8 23. Qb2 Qxh4 24. Kb1 Ne4 25. g3 Qf6 26. Qxf6 Nxf6 27.
f3 Nh5 28. Rhg1 Rhg8 29. g4 Nf4 30. Rge1 Rd6 31. h4 Rc8 32. h5 Rb6+ 33. Ka1 Kb8
34. Rd4 Ng2 35. Rg1 Ne3 36. Re1 Nc2# 0-1

Game 451713
Stan’s Net Chess
Game Played: 02 February 2009 to 3 March 2009
White: Comet (2105) Black: Mike Serovey (2248)

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d6

Pirc defense after 2... d6.

Pirc defense after 2… d6.

My original intent was to play a Benko Gambit but White’s second move nixed that idea. That is when I decided to steer the game into a Pirc defense instead. Luckily, I have a database of games in this opening to help me out. So far, every opponent has veered off from the game that I was trying to follow early into the opening.

3. e4 c6 4. Nf3 Qa5

Pirc defense after 4... Qa5.

Pirc defense after 4… Qa5.

Normally, I don’t like to develop the Queen this early in the game but if a GM plays it I will consider it.

5. Bd2 Bg4 6. Nd5 Qd8 7. Nxf6+ gxf6

Pirc defense after 7... gxf6.

Pirc defense after 7… gxf6.

Now, White has a slight positional advantage because he has the lead in development and Black has doubled pawns on the Kingside.

8. Be2 Nd7 9. h3 Bh5 10. Nh4 Bxe2 11. Qxe2 Qb6

Pirc defense after 11... Qb6.

Pirc defense after 11… Qb6.

Black gets the Queen back into the game by attacking the pawn at b2 and also prepares to castle queenside.

12. Bc3 e6 13. d5 O-O-O

Pirc defense after 13... 0-0-0.

Pirc defense after 13… 0-0-0.

White should now capture on c6 to weaken the pawn structure around the Black King. By capturing on e6 instead he undoubles Black’s pawns and evens out the position.

14. dxe6 fxe6 15. O-O-O d5 16. exd5 cxd5 17. Bd4 Bc5 18. c3 Kb8 19. Bxf6??

Pirc defense after 19. Bxf6??

Pirc defense after 19. Bxf6??

This turned out to be the losing move for White. After 19… Nxf6 20. Qe5+ Ka8 21. Qxf6 Rhf8 22. Qe5 Rxf2 23. Rd2 Rxd2 24. Kxd2 Qxb2+ (winning a pawn) 25. Kd3 Qxa2 26. Qxe6 Qc4+ 27. k-any Qxh4 and Black is up a Bishop and pawn. If instead 26. Qf6 then 26… Qc4+ 27. Kc2 Rf8 28. Qg5 Rf2+ 29. K-any Qa2 (threatening checkmate) 30. Qd2 ( the only move that prevents immediate checkmate) Rxd2 and White can’t avoid a checkmate on the second rank.

Nxf6 20. b4?

Pirc defense after 20. b4?

Pirc defense after 20. b4?

White’s last move weakens the pawn structure around his King. Originally, I was going to capture the pawn at f2 but then I realized I was already up a Bishop for a pawn so capturing on b4 was OK because I get my pawn back and weaken the pawns around the White King.

Bxb4 21. cxb4 Qxb4 22. Qe5+ Ka8

Pirc defense after 22... Ka8.

Pirc defense after 22… Ka8.

White has to play 23. Qb2 because if instead 23. Qxf6?? then Rc8#.

23. Qb2 Qxh4 (Black is now up a Knight and a pawn.) 24. Kb1 Ne4 25. g3 Qf6

Pirc defense after 25... Qf6.

Pirc defense after 25… Qf6.

Black is up a Knight and a pawn so he wants to get the queens off the board so that he can trade down into an easily won endgame. I have idea why White made me play this out all the way to checkmate. With queens off the board White has no chance to draw this game. I would have resigned here if I was White.

26. Qxf6 Nxf6 27. f3 Nh5 28. Rhg1 Rhg8 29. g4 Nf4

Pirc defense after 29... Nf4.

Pirc defense after 29… Nf4.

Black now has his Knight right where he wants it. The Knight defends the pawn at e6 and attacks the one at h3. If Black captures on h3 then Rh1 wins the pawn at h7. That is why Black did not capture on h3.

30. Rge1 Rd6 31. h4 Rc8 32. h5 Rb6+!

Pirc defense after 32... Rb6+!

Pirc defense after 32… Rb6+!

Black is setting up his pieces to either trade off rooks or checkmate the White King.

33. Ka1 Kb8 34. Rd4? Ng2

Pirc defense after 34... Ng2.

Pirc defense after 34… Ng2.

White’s last move forced the Black Knight to a better square. The Rook at e1 can’t come off the first rank because if it does come off the first rank Black will play Rc1#.

35. Rg1 Ne3 36. Re1 Nc2# 0-1

Pirc defense after 36... Nc2# (Final position).

Pirc defense after 36… Nc2# (Final position).

White allowed a fork on his King and both rooks. The only way to avoid checkmate was to play 36. Rd2 Nc2+ 37. Rxc2 Rxc2 leaving Black up a Rook and pawn and the White king cornered.

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