Welcome to my Pirc Defense (ECO B08) game with Alex Colins page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the Black side of the Pirc Defense. The game includes analysis and diagrams. This game transposed into a Pirc from a Queen Pawn opening.

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[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2006.07.11”]
[Round “2”]
[White “alexcolins”]
[Black “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ICCResult “Black resigns”]
[WhiteElo “1807”]
[BlackElo “1555”]
[Opening “Pirc: classical, h3 system”]
[ECO “B08”]
[NIC “PU.10”]
[Time “20:00:16”]
[TimeControl “3600+0”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 d6 4. e4 Bg7 5. h3 O-O 6. Be3 c5 7. dxc5 dxc5 8.
Qxd8 Rxd8 9. Bxc5 Nc6 10. Bd3 b6 11. Be3 Bb7 12. O-O-O e6 13. Rhe1 Rac8 14.
Bg5 Re8 15. Bb5 h6 16. Bh4 a6 17. Ba4 b5 18. Bb3 Na5 19. e5 Nh7 20. Kb1 Nxb3
21. axb3 g5 22. Bg3 Red8 23. Rd6 Bf8 24. Rxd8 Rxd8 25. Rd1 Rxd1+ 26. Nxd1
Bg7 27. Ne1 Nf8 28. Ne3 Nd7 29. Nd3 Be4 30. f4 gxf4 31. Bxf4 Bxd3 32. cxd3
Nxe5 33. Bxe5 Bxe5 34. Kc2 f5 35. Nf1 h5 36. Nd2 Kg7 37. Nf3 Bf6 38. d4 Kf7
39. Kc3 Be7 40. Kd3 Kf6 41. Ne5 Bd6 42. Nd7+ Kg5 43. Nc5 Bxc5 44. dxc5 Kf6
45. Kc3 e5 46. Kd3 Ke6 47. b4 Kd5 48. b3 Kc6 49. g3 Kd5 50. Ke3 Kc6 51. Kf3
Kd5 52. g4 fxg4+ 53. hxg4 hxg4+ 54. Kxg4 e4 55. Kf4 e3 56. Kxe3 Ke5 57. Ke2
Kd5 58. Kf3 Ke5 59. Kg4 Ke6 60. Kf4 Kd5 61. Kf5 Kc6 62. Ke6 Kc7 63. Kd5 Kd7
64. c6+ Kc7 65. Kc5 {Black resigns} 1-0

Online Game

ICC

11July 2006
White: Alex Colins (1807) Black: Mike Serovey (1555)

 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 d6 4. e4 Bg7

Pirc Defense after 4... Bg7.

Pirc Defense after 4… Bg7.

We have now transposed into a Classical Pirc Defense.

5. h3 O-O 6. Be3

Pirc Defense after 6. Be3.

Pirc Defense after 6. Be3.

Normally, I would play 6… c6 followed by b5 and a5. Here, instead, I tried to transpose into a Benoni type position or Sicilian Dragon but overlooked the fact that White had a Bishop on that diagonal!

c5? 7. dxc5 dxc5 8. Qxd8 Rxd8 9. Bxc5 Nc6

Pirc Defense after 9... Nc6.

Pirc Defense after 9… Nc6.

White is now up a pawn due to Black’s blunder on move 6. Black needs to take the pressure off the pawn at e7 and to get his Queenside attack going.

10. Bd3 b6 11. Be3 Bb7

Pirc Defense after 11... Bb7.

Pirc Defense after 11… Bb7.

Black has completed his development and will start his Queenside attack after White castles to that side. Still, Black is down a pawn and his troubles are far from over!

12. O-O-O e6 13. Rhe1 Rac8 14. Bg5 Re8

Pirc Defense after 14... Re8.

Pirc Defense after 14… Re8.

White is trying to pin the Black knights to the Black rooks and win either the knights or a rook for a bishop. Black does manage to work his way out of this mess.

15. Bb5 h6 16. Bh4 a6 17. Ba4 b5 18. Bb3 Na5

Pirc Defense after 18... Na5.

Pirc Defense after 18… Na5.

Black is trying to capture those pesky White bishops and to get his Queenside attack going.

19. e5 Nh7 20. Kb1 Nxb3 21. axb3 g5

Pirc Defense after 21... g5.

Pirc Defense after 21… g5.

Black has accomplished one of his goals. He has gotten rid of one of White’s bishops and has doubled White’s pawns on the Queenside. Black has also blocked the diagonal of White’s dark-squared bishop and can now challenge White on the d file.

22. Bg3 Red8 23. Rd6 Bf8 24. Rxd8 Rxd8 25. Rd1 Rxd1+ 26. Nxd1 Bg7

Pirc Defense after 26... Bg7.

Pirc Defense after 26… Bg7.

Black has gotten the rooks off the board and now plans to attack the overextended pawn on e5. First, though, he needs to get his Knight to a better square.

27. Ne1 Nf8 28. Ne3 Nd7 29. Nd3 Be4

Pirc Defense after 29... Be4.

Pirc Defense after 29… Be4.

Black has accomplished another goal. White cannot hold onto the pawn on e5, so he wrecks Black’s pawn structure on the Kingside.

30. f4 gxf4 31. Bxf4 Bxd3 32. cxd3 Nxe5 33. Bxe5 Bxe5

Pirc Defense after 33... Bxe5.

Pirc Defense after 33… Bxe5.

The material is now even and both sides have 3 pawn islands. At this point I was thinking about a draw but never offered one. Bishops are usually stronger than Knights in the endgame. Here, White decided to centralize his King and Black decided to trade off Kingside pawns because he has a Kingside majority.

34. Kc2 f5 35. Nf1 h5 36. Nd2 Kg7 37. Nf3

Pirc Defense after 37. Nf3.

Pirc Defense after 37. Nf3.

Here, Black decided to pull the Bishop back to f6 to avoid exchanging the Bishop for the Knight. Also, Black wanted to keep the White King off c3. However, I now wonder if Kf6 wasn’t better. Play could have continued 37… Kf6 38. Nxe5 Kxe5 39. Kc3 a5 40. b4 a4 41. b3 axb3 42. Kxb3 Kd4 43. Kc2 Ke3 and Black is better.

Bf6 38. d4 Kf7 39. Kc3 Be7 40. Kd3 Kf6 41. Ne5 Bd6 42. Nd7+

Pirc Defense after 42. Nd7+

Pirc Defense after 42. Nd7+

Here 42… Ke7 was better. The Knight on c5 now forks both the a pawn and the e pawn.

Kg5? 43. Nc5!

Pirc Defense after 43. Nc5!

Pirc Defense after 43. Nc5!

Capturing the White Knight on c5 allowed White to have a passed pawn on the c file. I wonder if instead of playing 43… Bxc5 if 43… e5 wasn’t better. For example 43… e5 44. dxe5 Bxe5 45. Nxa6 Bxb2 and Black is OK. Or. 43… e5 44. Nxa6 exd4 45. Kxd4 Kf4 46. Kd5 Be5 47. Kc6 Bxb2 48. Kxb5 Kg3 And White ends up with a passed pawn on the b file while Black gobbles up White’s 2 pawns on the Kingside. I believe that Black is better in this line too.

Bxc5? 44. dxc5 Kf6 45. Kc3 e5 46. Kd3 Ke6 47. b4 Kd5

Pirc Defense after 47... Kd5.

Pirc Defense after 47… Kd5.

Now, Black must keep his King near the passed White pawn on the c file!

48. b3

Pirc Defense after 48. B3.

Pirc Defense after 48. B3.

It didn’t occur to me until after I had lost this game that I could have played 48… a5 here! Play could then continue 49. Bxa5 Kxc5 50. Kc3 b4+ 51. Kd3 Kb5 52. a6 Kxa6 53. Kc4 e4! and I believe that Black is better.

Kc6 49. g3 Kd5 50. Ke3

Pirc Defense after 50. Ke3.

Pirc Defense after 50. Ke3.

At this point I thought that I had a drawn position. White is preparing to trade off the Kingside pawns while Black is wasting time moving the King back and forth. Better here for Black was 50… e4. Play could then go 51. Kf4 a5 52. bxa5 Kxc5 53. b4+! Kc6. Black cannot capture the b pawn here because then the a pawn would queen.

Kc6 51. Kf3 Kd5 52. g4 fxg4+ 53. hxg4 hxg4+ 54. Kxg4 e4

Pirc Defense after 54... e4.

Pirc Defense after 54… e4.

At this point Black has even material and a passed pawn. However, Black still has to stop the White pawn on the c file from queening and thus cannot walk his king and e pawn in for a Queen. Black’s best try here might be to play 54… a5 and capture the c pawn. However, then he has to keep track of White’s newly created passed a pawn! At this point Black is lost no matter what he does!

55. Kf4 e3 56. Kxe3 Ke5 57. Ke2 Kd5 58. Kf3 Ke5 59. Kg4 Ke6 60. Kf4 Kd5 61. Kf5 Kc6 62. Ke6 Kc7 63. Kd5 Kd7 64. c6+ Kc7 65. Kc5  1-0

Pirc Defense after 65. Kc5 (Final position).

Pirc Defense after 65. Kc5 (Final position).

Final position, Black resigned.

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