Welcome to my King’s Indian Defense – 6.Be2 (ECO E91) ICC online game with SlowMoe!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the Black side of the King’s Indian Defense – 6.Be2.

SlowMoe is a computer program that plays online at ICC. I will need to go through my games scores to be sure, but I believe that I have beaten this program every time that I have played against it.

[Event “ICC 20 20”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2005.05.30”]
[Round “-“]
[White “SlowMoe”]
[Black “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ICCResult “White checkmated”]
[WhiteElo “1673”]
[BlackElo “1556”]
[Opening “King’s Indian: 6.Be2”]
[ECO “E91”]
[NIC “KI.19”]
[Time “21:07:38”]
[TimeControl “1200+20”]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. d4 O-O 6. Be2 c5 7. O-O cxd4 8.
Nxd4 Nc6 9. Be3 a6 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bd3 c5 12. Qb3 Bd7 13. Be2 Qc7 14. Rfd1
Rfb8 15. Qa3 Rb4 16. f4 Bc6 17. e5 Ne4 18. exd6 exd6 19. Re1 Nxc3 20. bxc3
Ra4 21. Qb2 Rb8 22. Qd2 Ra3 23. Rac1 Rd8 24. Bg4 Qa5 25. Qf2 Bxc3 26. Red1
Bg7 27. Rc2 Rc3 28. f5 Rxc2 29. Qxc2 Be5 30. Qb3 Qb4 31. Qd3 Qb7 32. Bxc5
Bxg2 33. fxg6 hxg6 34. Bb6 Bh1 35. Qe2 Rb8 36. Bc7 Qxc7 37. Kxh1 f5 38. Bf3
Kg7 39. Rd2 Rb1+ 40. Kg2 Kf6 41. Bd5 Qh7 42. h3 Qh6 43. Qd3 Qg5+ 44. Kf2
Qg1+ 45. Kf3 Rf1+ 46. Qxf1 Qxf1+ 47. Rf2 Qxh3+ 48. Ke2 Qa3 49. Kf1 g5 50.
Rd2 Qc1+ 51. Ke2 g4 52. Kd3 f4 53. c5 Qxc5 54. Ke2 Qe3+ 55. Kd1 f3 56. Kc2
f2 57. Bg2 Qe1 58. Kd3 f1=Q+ 59. Bxf1 Qxf1+ 60. Kc2 g3 61. a3 g2 62. Rxg2
Qxg2+ 63. Kc1 Qb2+ 64. Kd1 Qxa3 65. Kd2 Qc3+ 66. Kd1 Qb2 67. Ke1 a5 68. Kf1
a4 69. Ke1 a3 70. Kd1 a2 71. Ke1 a1=Q# {White checkmated} 0-1

Online Game
ICC
White: SlowMoe (1673) Black: Mike Serovey (1556)

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. d4 O-O 6. Be2

King's Indian Defense after 6. Be2.

King’s Indian Defense after 6. Be2.

ECO gives this line its own number. My strategy as Black is going to be pretty much the same no matter where White puts those two bishops. Black has the option of playing 6… e5 with a Kingside attack or 6… c5 with a Queenside attack. I opted for the latter.

c5 7. O-O cxd4 8. Nxd4 Nc6

King's Indian Defense after 8... Nc6.

King’s Indian Defense after 8… Nc6.

Now we have transposed into the Maroczy Bind variation of the Sicilian Dragon

9. Be3 a6 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bd3 c5 12. Qb3 Bd7

King's Indian Defense after 12... Bd7.

King’s Indian Defense after 12… Bd7.

Both sides have completed their development and Black prepares for a Queenside attack. White seems to be playing without a plan. A bad plan is better than no plan at all!

13. Be2 (This is the third time this Bishop has moved!) Qc7 14. Rfd1 Rfb8

King's Indian Defense after 14... Rfb8.

King’s Indian Defense after 14… Rfb8.

White is attacking the Center along the d file while Black has locked up the Center pawns and is attacking the Queenside along the b file.

15. Qa3 Rb4 16. f4 Bc6

King's Indian Defense after 16... Bc6.

King’s Indian Defense after 16… Bc6.

Black is now attacking White’s pawns on c4 and e4. White is countering with an attack in the Center.

17. e5 Ne4 18. exd6

King's Indian Defense after 18. exd6.

King’s Indian Defense after 18. exd6.

Black played 18… exd6 here but 18… Nxe6 may have been better. Black wanted to exchange Knights and put pressure on b2.

exd6 19. Re1 Nxc3 20. bxc3 Ra4

King's Indian Defense after 20... Ra4.

King’s Indian Defense after 20… Ra4.

Now, Black is better because the White Queen is under attack from the Black Rook on a4 and because black controls the long diagonal from a1 to h8. Black can grab the open b file with his Rook on a8 and is threatening to win the doubled pawn on c3 if White leaves it unguarded.

21. Qb2 Rb8 22. Qd2 Ra3

King's Indian Defense after 22... Ra3.

King’s Indian Defense after 22… Ra3.

Now Black is clearly better even though the material is even. Black is putting tremendous pressure on White’s Queenside pawns and should eventually win one of them.

23. Rac1 Rd8 24. Bg4 Qa5!

King's Indian Defense after 24... Qa5!

King’s Indian Defense after 24… Qa5!

Black now has two pieces attacking the White pawn on a2 and three pieces attacking the White pawn on c3. White will have trouble defending both pawns and thus one will fall.

25. Qf2 Bxc3 26. Red1 Bg7

King's Indian Defense after 26... Bg7.

King’s Indian Defense after 26… Bg7.

Black is up a pawn here and is still putting pressure on the pawn at a2.

27. Rc2 Rc3

King's Indian Defense after 27... Rc3.

King’s Indian Defense after 27… Rc3.

Black is up a pawn here and thus wants to trade down into a won endgame. Also, Black continues to put pressure on White’s Queenside pawns.

28. f5 (Trying to get some counterplay on the Kingside.) Rxc2 29. Qxc2 Be5 30. Qb3 Qb4

King's Indian Defense after 30... Qb4.

King’s Indian Defense after 30… Qb4.

Black wants to trade Queens and then trade his d pawn for White’s c pawn and thus create a passed pawn on the c file. White declines to Queen trade.

31. Qd3 Qb7 32. Bxc5 Bxg2

King's Indian Defense after 32... Bxg2.

King’s Indian Defense after 32… Bxg2.

Black is now threatening to mate in two with Bh1 and Qg2#.

33. fxg6 hxg6 (It is usually better to recapture towards the Center.) 34. Bb6 Bh1 35. Qe2 Rb8 36. Bc7 Qxc7 37. Kxh1

King's Indian Defense after 37. Kxh1.

King’s Indian Defense after 37. Kxh1.

Now we have an endgame with Bishops of opposite color, which is usually a draw. However, Black still has an extra pawn and the Queens and one Rook each are still on the board. Both sides have three pawn islands each. Here Black decided to expand on the Kingside.

 f5 38. Bf3 Kg7 39. Rd2 Rb1+ 40. Kg2 Kf6

King's Indian Defense after 40... Kf6.

King’s Indian Defense after 40… Kf6.

Even though both Queens are on the board it is still good to bring the Kings into the Center to support pawn advances and have more King mobility. Black’s pieces here seem to be more actively placed than White’s.

41. Bd5 Qh7 42. h3 Qh6 43. Qd3 Qg5+

King's Indian Defense after 43... Qg5+

King’s Indian Defense after 43… Qg5+

Black is attacking White’s King and White cannot do much more than to defend against the attack.

44. Kf2 Qg1+ 45. Kf3 Rf1+

King's Indian Defense after 45... Rf1+!

King’s Indian Defense after 45… Rf1+!

The White King is running out of squares here. If 46. Rf2?? Qg3+!! 47. Ke2 Qxf2#

46. Qxf1 Qxf1+

King's Indian Defense after 46... Qxf1+

King’s Indian Defense after 46… Qxf1+

Now White is down a Queen and pawn for a Rook. Most humans would resign about now.

47. Rf2 Qxh3+ (Winning yet another pawn.) 48. Ke2 Qa3 49. Kf1 g5 50. Rd2 Qc1+ 51. Ke2 g4

King's Indian Defense after 51... g4.

King’s Indian Defense after 51… g4.

Queen versus Rook is not an easy endgame to win. Black advances his Kingside pawns to restrict the White King’s movements and also to queen one of them.

52. Kd3 f4 53. c5 Qxc5 54. Ke2 Qe3+

King's Indian Defense after 54... Qe3+

King’s Indian Defense after 54… Qe3+

Black is now up a Queen and three pawns for a Rook! The White King is once again running out of squares to run to.

55. Kd1 f3 56. Kc2 f2 57. Bg2 Qe1 58. Kd3 f1=Q+

King's Indian Defense after 58... f1=Q+

King’s Indian Defense after 58… f1=Q+

It is nice having two Queens on the board, even if one of them gets captured right away!

59. Bxf1 Qxf1+ 60. Kc2 g3 61. a3 g2!

King's Indian Defense after 61... g2!

King’s Indian Defense after 61… g2!

This forces White to sacrifice his Rook for a pawn.

 62. Rxg2 Qxg2+ 63. Kc1 Qb2+ 64. Kd1 Qxa3 65. Kd2 Qc3+

King's Indian Defense after 65... Qc3+

King’s Indian Defense after 65… Qc3+

From here all Black has to do is march the a pawn down to a1 and queen it for an easy win.

66. Kd1 Qb2 67. Ke1 a5 68. Kf1 a4 69. Ke1 a3 70. Kd1 a2 71. Ke1 a1=Q# 0-1

King's Indian Defense after 71 a1=Q# (Final position).

King’s Indian Defense after 71 a1=Q# (Final position).

This time I get to keep my second Queen!

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