Welcome to my Kings Indian Defense (ECO E67) ICC online correspondence chess game with Antonio Mendonca Silveira!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the Kings Indian Defense.

The game started off as a Réti and transposed into a Kings Indian Defense. The ratings listed below are for each player at the end of this game.

[Event “ICC correspondence 2008Quad.08.04”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2008.08.10”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “AntonioMendonca”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ICCResult “Black resigns”]
[Opening “King’s Indian: fianchetto, classical variation”]
[ECO “E67”]
[NIC “KI.65”]
[Time “19:53:04”]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. g3 O-O 5. Bg2 d6 6. O-O e5 7. d4 Nbd7 8.
dxe5 dxe5 9. e4 c6 10. Qd6 Re8 11. Rd1 Bf8 12. Qd3 Qc7 13. h3 Nc5 14. Qe2 a5
15. Bg5 Nh5 16. Be3 b6 17. Rd2 Bd6 18. Rad1 Bf8 19. Nh2 Be6 20. Ng4 Bxg4 21.
hxg4 Nf6 22. Bxc5 Bxc5 23. g5 Nh5 24. Rd7 Qc8 25. Na4 Qb8 26. Nxc5 bxc5 27.
Qf3 Rf8 28. Qc3 Ng7 29. Bh3 Re8 30. R1d6 Ra6 31. Rf6 Rf8 32. Qd2 Ra8 33.
Rxc6 {Black resigns} 1-0

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Online Correspondence Chess Game

ICC
Dates Played: 10 August 2008 to 6 December 2008
White: Mike Serovey (1682) Black:
Antonio Mendonca Silveira
(1691)

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. g3 O-O 5. Bg2 d6 6. O-O e5 7. d4

Kings Indian Defense after 7. d4.

Kings Indian Defense after 7. d4.

Up to this point White is playing a Réti opening. His last move transposes this game into a King’s Indian: fianchetto, classical variation. I still have this game in my database as a Réti opening.

Nbd7 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. e4 c6

Kings Indian Defense after 9... c6.

Kings Indian Defense after 9… c6.

I am guessing that Black’s last moved was played in order to prevent Nd5, but it allows 10. Qd6 attacking the Black pawn on e5.

10. Qd6 Re8 11. Rd1 Bf8 12. Qd3 Qc7 13. h3 Nc5

Kings Indian Defense after 13... Nc5.

Kings Indian Defense after 13… Nc5.

Although Black’s knights are well placed his bishops are not.

14. Qe2 a5 15. Bg5 Nh5

Kings Indian Defense after 15... Nh5.

Kings Indian Defense after 15… Nh5.

I, personally, think that 15… Bg7 was a better move because knights are not very effective on the edge of the board. Later on that Knight gets forced back to g7 where it still does nothing.

16. Be3 b6 17. Rd2 Bd6 18. Rad1 Bf8

Kings Indian Defense after 18... Bf8.

Kings Indian Defense after 18… Bf8.

Black’s last two moves were wasted while White was able to double his rooks on the d file. Black still needs to get his Queen’s Rook and Bishop into this game.

19. Nh2 Be6 20. Ng4 Bxg4 21. hxg4 Nf6 22. Bxc5 Bxc5

Kings Indian Defense after 22... Bxc5.

Kings Indian Defense after 22… Bxc5.

White now has doubled pawns on the Kingside and Black’s Bishop seems to be stronger than White’s. However, Black has left the dark squares around his King unprotected and White now has the h file to attack on. White’s rooks are better placed than Black’s.

23. g5 Nh5 24. Rd7 Qc8 25. Na4 Qb8 26. Nxc5 bxc5

Kings Indian Defense after 26... bxc5.

Kings Indian Defense after 26… bxc5.

Now both sides have doubled pawns. White has an edge because he controls the d file. White now decides to put some pressure on f7 which ties Black down to defending that square.

27. Qf3 Rf8 28. Qc3 Ng7 29. Bh3 Re8 30. R1d6 Ra6

Kings Indian Defense after 30... Ra6.

Kings Indian Defense after 30… Ra6.

It was somewhere around here that Black offered a draw and I declined. Black now has to defend c6, e5 and f7. He eventually drops the pawn at c6.

31. Rf6 Rf8 32. Qd2 Ra8

Kings Indian Defense after 32... Ra8.

Kings Indian Defense after 32… Ra8.

Black’s last move drops the pawn at c6 and makes defending c5 difficult but it was played in order to prevent 33. Rfxf7 Rxf7 34. Rd8+ Qxd8 35. Qxd8+ giving White a Queen and pawn for two rooks. That is even material but Black can’t avoid losing material in order to prevent checkmate.

33. Rxc6 1-0

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