Welcome to my Réti / Kings Indian Attack (ECO A08) game with DoubleUP page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in the Kings Indian Attack.

The game includes analysis and diagrams.

[Event "S16"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2005.03.16"]
[Round "11"]
[White "OnGoldenPawn"]
[Black "DoubleUp"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ICCResult "Game drawn because neither player has mating material"]
[WhiteElo "1363"]
[BlackElo "1150"]
[Opening "Réti: King's Indian attack"]
[ECO "A08"]
[NIC "QP.09"]
[Time "17:52:47"]
[TimeControl "300+1"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 c5 3. Bg2 Nc6 4. O-O e5 5. d3 Nf6 6. c4 d4 7. a3 b6 8. b4 Bb7 9. b5 Ne7 
10. Nxe5 Bxg2 11. Kxg2 Ng6 12. Nxg6 hxg6 13. Bg5 Be7 14. Nd2  Rc8 15. e4 Rc7 16. Bf4 Rd7 
17. e5 Ng8 18. Ne4 Qa8 19. f3 f5 20. exf6 gxf6 21. Rh1 Bd8 22. a4 Rdh7 23. g4 Qc8 24. 
Qe2 Re7 25. Rae1 f5 26. Nd6+ Kd7 27. Nxc8 Rxe2+ 28. Rxe2 Kxc8 29. Rhe1 Nf6 30. h3 Kd7 
31. Bg3 Re8 32. Rxe8 Nxe8 33. Re6 Kxe6 34. gxf5+ Kxf5 35. Bb8 Bc7 36. Bxa7 Kf4 37. Kf2 
Nf6 38. a5 Nd7 39. axb6 Bxb6 40. Bxb6 Nxb6 41. h4 Kf5 42. Kg3 g5 43. h5 Kf6 44. Kg4 Nd7 
45. f4 gxf4 46. Kxf4 Kg7 47. Ke4 Kh6 48. Kd5 Kxh5 49. Kd6 Nf6 50. Kxc5 Kg5 51. Kxd4 Nd7 
52. Kd5 Kf6 53. d4 Ke7 54. c5 Nf6+ 55. Kc6 Kd8 56. d5 Nd7 57. d6 Ne5+ 58. Kb6 Kd7 59. 
c6+ Kxd6 60. c7 Nc4+ 61. Kb7 Na5+ 62. Kb6 Nc4+ 63. Ka6 Kxc7 64. b6+ Nxb6 
{Game drawn because neither player has mating material}

Online Chess Game
ICC
Game Played 16 Mar 2005
White: Mike Serovey (1363) Black:
DoubleUP (1150)

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 c5 3. Bg2 Nc6 4. O-O e5

Kings Indian Attack after 4... e5

Kings Indian Attack after 4… e5

This position resembles and Alekhine Defense with colors reversed. This position can be the first 4 moves of the Réti or the Kings Indian Attack.

5. d3 Nf6 6. c4 d4

Kings Indian Attack after 6... d4

Kings Indian Attack after 6… d4

Now I have the position that I wanted. This position is typical of some English, Réti and Kings Indian Attack lines. I often transpose from one opening to another when playing chess.

7. a3 b6 8. b4 Bb7

Kings Indian Attack after 8... Bb7

Kings Indian Attack after 8… Bb7

Here White is playing for a Reversed Benko Gambit, an opening that I have had some success with.

9. b5 Ne7 10. Nxe5

Kings Indian Attack after 10. Nxe5

Kings Indian Attack after 10. Nxe5

I usually avoid trading my fianchettoed Bishop because it weakens the squares around my King. Here, I think that it is OK to trade because Black is still disorganized and White has more space on the Queenside. Also, White is the higher rated player.

Bxg2 11. Kxg2 Ng6 12. Nxg6 hxg6

Kings Indian Attack after 12... hxg6

Kings Indian Attack after 12… hxg6

White has more space on the Queenside and a better pawn structure. White has an unbroken pawn chain from a3 to h2. Black has two pawn islands with doubled pawns on the Queenside. Black has the King Rook and the King Knight developed. White doesn’t have anything developed here and is thus lagging behind in development.

13. Bg5 (To pin the Knight to the Queen.)Be7 (To break the pin on the Knight.) 14. Nd2 Rc8 15. e4 Rc7 16. Bf4 Rd7 17. e5 Ng8 18. Ne4 Qa8

Kings Indian Attack after 18... Qa8

Kings Indian Attack after 18… Qa8

Here we are 18 moves into the game and Black still has not castled! As a general rule, a player should castle by move 10. White has more space across the board and better placement of his Bishop and Knight. Black moved the Queen to a8 to pin the Knight on e4 to the White King. The knight is safe, though, because if 19… f5 then 20. exf6 as in the actual game here.

19. f3 f5 20. exf6 gxf6 21. Rh1 Bd8

Kings Indian Attack after 21... Bd8

Kings Indian Attack after 21… Bd8

White needs to protect the pawn on h2 and keep Black’s Rooks from getting too strong on the h file. Black repositions his Bishop to trade it off.

22. a4 Rdh7 23. g4

Kings Indian Attack after 23. g4

Kings Indian Attack after 23. g4

Black is after the pawn on h2 and wants to control the h file. 23. g4 gives White’s Bishop control of two diagonals and helps to guard the pawn on h2.

23… Qc8?? (loses the Queen to the Knight fork on d6)

Kings Indian Attack after 23... Qc8??

Kings Indian Attack after 23… Qc8??

This was a 5 minute Blitz game. I saw the Knight fork immediately after moving my Queen! If this game had been played at a slower time limit we both may have seen the fork.

24. Qe2 Re7 25. Rae1 f5 26. Nd6+ Kd7 27. Nxc8 Rxe2+

Kings Indian Attack after 27... Rxe2+

Kings Indian Attack after 27… Rxe2+

Now both Queens are off the board and White will have the only open file. White is about to go up the exchange and a pawn.

 28. Rxe2 Kxc8 29. Rhe1 Nf6

Kings Indian Attack after 29... Nf6

Kings Indian Attack after 29… Nf6

White is up material and has his King and Bishop guarding the pawn on h2. White also has his Rooks doubled on the e file and he has more space on the Queenside. At a slower time limit White would be winning.

30. h3 Kd7 31. Bg3 Re8?

Kings Indian Attack after 31... Re8?

Kings Indian Attack after 31… Re8?

I gave this move a ? because it is best to avoid trading pieces when you are down material. Here Black should strive to trade pawns or to keep the position closed and not trade any pieces at all. After the trade White still controls the open file.

32. Rxe8 Nxe8 33. Re6??

Kings Indian Attack after 33. Re6??

Kings Indian Attack after 33. Re6??

A time pressure blunder. White is trying to mop up the pawns on the Kingside and overlooked that the Rook was no longer protected. Better would have been 33. gxf5.

Kxe6 34. gxf5+ Kxf5

Kings Indian Attack after 34... Kxf5

Kings Indian Attack after 34… Kxf5

Now White is down a Knight for a Pawn. Because of one bad move White went from winning to hoping for a draw!

35. Bb8 Bc7 36. Bxa7 Kf4

Kings Indian Atack after 36... Kf4.

Kings Indian Atack after 36… Kf4.

Now White has two pawns for the Knight. White is still down but has better drawing chances.

37. Kf2 (To keep Black away from his Queenside pawns) Nf6 38. a5 Nd7 39. axb6 Bxb6

Kings Indian attack after 39... Bxb6.

Kings Indian attack after 39… Bxb6.

Now White has no choice but to trade the Bishops. White’s passed Pawn on the Queenside is not enough to win here. White is still playing for a draw.

40. Bxb6 Nxb6 41. h4 Kf5 42. Kg3 g5 43. h5! Kf6

Kings Indian Attack after 43... Kf6.

Kings Indian Attack after 43… Kf6.

White now has two passed Pawns against the Knight. White is playing for the opposition here. White wants to keep the Black King busy with the h Pawn while moving his King over to the Queenside to mop up some pawns.

44. Kg4 Nd7 45. f4 gxf4 46. Kxf4 Kg7 47. Ke4 Kh6 48. Kd5 Kxh5 49. Kd6 Nf6 50. Kxc5 Kg5 51. Kxd4 Nd7

Kings Indian Attack after 51... Nd7.

Kings Indian Attack after 51… Nd7.

I think that this entire endgame has been instructional. Now we have three connected passed Pawns versus a lone Knight. With less than a minute remaining on my clock I was unable to find a win here. Black can’t win because of insufficient mating material. The question is, can White win other than by running Black out of time?

52. Kd5 Kf6 53. d4 Ke7 54. c5 Nf6+ 55. Kc6 Kd8 56. d5 Nd7 57. d6 Ne5+ 58. Kb6 Kd7

Kings Indian Attack after 58... Kd7.

Kings Indian Attack after 58… Kd7.

59. c6+ Kxd6 60. c7 Nc4+ 61. Kb7 Na5+ 62. Kb6?

Kings Indian Attack after 62. Kb6?

Kings Indian Attack after 62. Kb6?

If instead White had played 62. Kb8! then Black no longer has any checks because if 62… Kc6+?? 63. bxc6 Kxc6 64. c8=Queen check and White wins.

Nc4+ 63. Ka6? (See notes above) Kxc7 64. b6+ Nxb6 1/2 – 1/2

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