Welcome to my  French Defense Advanced – Euwe Variation (ECO C02) ICC online game with yacc.

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the French Defense – Euwe Variation.

Yacc is a computer program that plays online at ICC, but I have not seen it lately.

[Event “ICC 20 20”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2006.12.24”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “yacc”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ICCResult “Black checkmated”]
[WhiteElo “1520”]
[BlackElo “1502”]
[Opening “French: advance, Euwe variation”]
[ECO “C02”]
[NIC “FR.03”]
[Time “22:21:40”]
[TimeControl “1200+20”]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bd7 4. c3 c5 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. cxd4 Nb4 8.
O-O Nxd3 9. Qxd3 Bb4 10. a3 Be7 11. Nc3 Rc8 12. Bd2 Qb6 13. b4 Rc4 14. Rfc1
f6 15. Be3 Kf7 16. Nd2 Rc7 17. Na2 Bb5 18. Qb3 fxe5 19. dxe5 Rxc1+ 20. Rxc1
d4 21. Bf4 d3 22. a4 Ba6 23. b5 Bh4 24. Be3 Qa5 25. bxa6 Qxa6 26. Nb4 Qa5
27. Nxd3 b6 28. Qb4 Qxb4 29. Nxb4 Be7 30. Nc6 a6 31. Bxb6 Ba3 32. Rc3 Bb2
33. Rd3 Ne7 34. Rd7 Re8 35. Bc5 Bc3 36. Nc4 Kg6 37. Nxe7+ Kh5 38. Ra7 Rb8
39. Nb6 Bxe5 40. Nc6 Bd6 41. Nxb8 Bxc5 42. Rxa6 Kg4 43. N6d7 Bd4 44. Rxe6
Kf5 45. Re8 Kf4 46. a5 Ba7 47. Nc6 Bxf2+ 48. Kxf2 h5 49. a6 g5 50. a7 Kf5
51. a8=Q Kg4 52. Qa4+ Kf5 53. Qe4# {Black checkmated} 1-0

Online Game
ICC
White: Mike Serovey (1520) Black: yacc (1502)

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bd7

French Defense after 3... Bd7.

French Defense after 3… Bd7.

This move is usually played later on in the game. However, there is nothing wrong with playing it here. At this point White continues with his normal development.

4. c3 c5 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. cxd4 Nb4

French Defense after 7... Nb4.

French Defense after 7… Nb4.

Things went pretty much the way that I expected until this move. Black moved his Knight twice in the opening in order to attack my Bishop on d3. It is usually better to move all of your pieces off the back rank before moving something twice. Now, White has to decide on whether to move his Bishop or allow it to be captured. I decided to continue developing my pieces and to allow the capture on d3. The move that I was expecting was 7… Qb6.

8. O-O Nxd3 9. Qxd3 Bb4 10. a3 Be7

French Defense after 10... Be7.

French Defense after 10… Be7.

Black has moved his dark-squared Bishop twice. The Bishop did nothing on b4 but I kicked it anyway. White has more space and better control of the Center. White also has slightly better development.

11. Nc3 Rc8 12. Bd2 Qb6

French Defense after 12... Qb6.

French Defense after 12… Qb6.

White has all of his minor pieces developed and is preparing for a Queenside attack. Black still has his King in the Center and his King’s Knight and King’s Rook are out of play. Black decided to counter attack on the Queenside instead of continue his Kingside development.

13. b4 Rc4 14. Rfc1 f6

French Defense after 14... f6.

French Defense after 14… f6.

Now Black is challenging the Center by attacking the pawn on e5.  Capturing on f6 allows Black to develop his King’s Knight to that square or to capture on f6 with the Bishop and then have two pieces attacking the pawn on d4. I decided to decline the pawn on f6 and to allow Black to capture on e5 where I would recapture with the d pawn to keep Black’s Knight off f6. At this point I had considered sacrificing my Knight by capturing on d5 but didn’t get enough compensation for it.  My next move fortifies the pawn on d4 and indirectly attacks Black’s Queen. This was done mainly to discourage the pawn capture on e5.

15. Be3 Kf7 16. Nd2 Rc7 17. Na2

French Defense after 17. Na2.

French Defense after 17. Na2.

White wants to exchange rooks on c1 and thus control the c file. Because Black is still lagging behind in development it is a good idea for White to exchange off Black’s active pieces.

Bb5 18. Qb3 fxe5 19. dxe5 Rxc1+ 20. Rxc1 d4

French Defense after 20... d4.

French Defense after 20… d4.

Black is still lagging behind in development but now has a passed pawn in the Center as compensation. That pawn, however, is blockaded by the Knight on d2. That pawn is eventually lost because White’s Queenside pawn expansion chases away the pieces that are protecting it.

21. Bf4 d3 22. a4 Ba6??

French Defense after 22... Ba6??

French Defense after 22… Ba6??

Black is trying to protect the pawn on d3, but ends up losing the Bishop for a pawn instead! Better was 22… Bd7. This is the first blunder of the game but not the last.

23. b5! Bh4 24. Be3 Qa5 25. bxa6 Qxa6

French Defense after 25... Qxa6.

French Defense after 25… Qxa6.

White is now up a Knight for a pawn and still has the lead in development! This game is a perfect example of why you should never allow yourself to lag behind in development! White now attacks the Queen with a Knight and simultaneously attacks, and then wins, the pawn on d3 which puts White up a full Knight.

26. Nb4 Qa5 27. Nxd3 b6 28. Qb4

French Defense after 25... Qxa6.

French Defense after 25… Qxa6.

It is to White’s advantage to trade queens here because he is up a piece and still has the lead in development!

Qxb4 29. Nxb4 Be7?

French Defense after 29... Be7?

French Defense after 29… Be7?

I give Black’s last move a question mark for two reasons: 1) it neglects the development of the King’s Knight and Rook and 2) it forces the White Knight to a better square.

 30. Nc6 a6 31. Bxb6 Ba3 32. Rc3 Bb2 33. Rd3 Ne7

French Defense after 33... Ne7.

French Defense after 33… Ne7.

Finally Black develops the King’s Knight and frees up the King’s Rook! This is like scoring a touchdown in the last two minutes of a football game when you are down 21 points. It
is too little too late! White pins that Knight to the Black King and does win it.

34. Rd7 Re8 35. Bc5 Bc3 36. Nc4 Kg6 37. Nxe7+ Kh5

French Defense after 37... Kh5.

French Defense after 37… Kh5.

At this point Black is down 2 knights and a pawn. I would be insulted if a human player made me play this out from here! But, this is a computer program and it makes me play this out to mate.

38. Ra7 Rb8 39. Nb6!

French Defense after 39. Nb6!

French Defense after 39. Nb6!

White’s last move blocks the Black Rook from checkmating on b1 and dangles the pawn on e5 as bait, which Black takes. 40. Nc6 forks the Rook and Bishop and thus wins the exchange.

Bxe5 40. Nc6 Bd6 41. Nxb8 Bxc5 42. Rxa6 Kg4

French Defense after 42... Kg4.

French Defense after 42… Kg4.

White is now up a Rook and Knight and a pawn. White goes on to queen a pawn and then checkmate Black.

43. N6d7 Bd4 44. Rxe6 Kf5 45. Re8 Kf4 46. a5 Ba7

French Defense after 46... Ba7.

French Defense after 46… Ba7.

White is now up a Rook, a Knight and two pawns. There must be a glitch in Black’s programming because on the next move it sacrifices its remaining piece for a pawn.

47. Nc6 Bxf2+?? 48. Kxf2 h5 49. a6 g5 50. a7 Kf5 51. a8=Q Kg4 52. Qa4+ Kf5 53. Qe4# 1-0

French Defense after 53. Qe4# (Final position).

French Defense after 53. Qe4# (Final position).

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