Welcome to my English Opening (ECO A21?) game with PrincePawn page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the English Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. This game is an English Opening versus a Dutch Defense. Black’s second move takes this game out of ECO classification, as far as I can tell.

[Event “ICC Game #317”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “PrincePawn”]
[Result “1-0”]

1.c4 e5 2. Nc3 f5 3. d3 Nf6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. e4 fxe4 7. dxe4 O-O 8. Nge2 d6 9. O-O c6 10. f4 exf4 11. Bxf4 Qb6+ 12. Kh1 Bg4 13. Qb3 Qxb3 14. axb3 Na6 15. Bxd6 Rfd8 16. e5 Nd7 17. Be7 Re8 18. Bf6 Nxf6 19. exf6 Bxf6 20. Rxf6 Bxe2 21. Nxe2 Rxe2 22. Rb1 Nb4 23. Kg1 Re3 24. Rf3 Re2 25. Bf1 Rd2 26. Rf2 Rxf2 27. Kxf2 Rd8 28. Ke3 Nc2+ 29. Ke4 Rd2 30. h4 Rd4+ 31. Kf3 Nb4 32. Be2 h5 33. Rd1 Rxd1 34. Bxd1 Kf7 35. Ke4 Kf6 36. g4 hxg4 37. Bxg4 b6 38. Kd4 c5+ 39. Ke4 Nc6 40. h5 Na5 41. hxg6 Nxb3 42. Kd5 Na5 43. Bd1 Kxg6 44. b3 Kf6 45. Kd6 Kf5 46. Kc7 Ke4 47. Kb8 Kd4 48. Kxa7 Kc3 49. Kxb6 Nxb3 50. Bxb3 Kxb3 51. Kxc5 Ka4 52. Kc6 Ka5  53. c5 Ka6 54. Kc7 Ka7 55. c6 Ka8 56. Kc8 Ka7 57. c7 Ka8 58. Kd8 Kb7 59. c8=Q+ {Black resigns} 1-0


Online Chess Game
ICC
White
: Mike Serovey (1701) Black: PrincePawn (1635)

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 f5

English Opening after 2... f5.

English Opening after 2… f5.

It appears that Black wants to play a Dutch Defense here. This game gets a little odd with both players wanting to attack on the Kingside. Prior to Black’s second move the ECO classification for this game was A21. Now, the game is out of any classification that I can find.

3. d3 Nf6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. e4

 

English Opening after 6. e4.

English Opening after 6. e4.

As White, I play this setup against almost anything that Black plays.

fxe4 7. dxe4 O-O 8. Nge2 d6 9. O-O c6

English Opening after 9... c6.

English Opening after 9… c6.

Black’s last move prevents Nd5, which is a key move in this opening. Even so, White continues with his kingside attack.

10. f4 exf4 11. Bxf4 Qb6+

English Opening after 11... Qb6+

English Opening after 11… Qb6+

I have seen that check with the Queen in several games in which I didn’t have the Bishop at e3 prior to playing f4. It gets annoying at times! If Black captures the pawn at b2 White can then take the pawn at d6 and the material will be even. Black decided here to go for a pin instead of trading pawns. White replied by moving the Queen off the diagonal that the Black Bishop is on and then to offer a trade of queens too. White then ends up with doubled pawns but also gets the pawn at d6. Note that White also has the lead in development here.

12. Kh1 Bg4 13. Qb3 Qxb3 14. axb3 Na6 15. Bxd6 Rfd8 16. e5 Nd7

English Opening after 16... Nd7.

English Opening after 16… Nd7.

I think that 16… Ne8 was better here. White is up a passed pawn in the Center and Black wants to win that pawn. However, Black’s next three moves lead to a loss of material.

17. Be7 Re8 18. Bf6

English Opening after 18. Bf6.

English Opening after 18. Bf6.

Playing 18… Nxe5 wins a pawn outright. Playing 18… Nxf6?? leads to the loss of material.

Nxf6?? 19. exf6

English Opening after 19. exf6.

English Opening after 19. exf6.

Black now has a dilemma. He can sacrifice a Bishop for a pawn or he can move his Bishop and allow f7+ forking the King and Rook. Black chose the first option which loses less material.

Bxf6 20. Rxf6 Bxe2! 21. Nxe2 Rxe2

English Opening after 21... Rxe2.

English Opening after 21… Rxe2.

White left his Knight on e2 under protected and thus Black was able to win it and even up the material. However, White does have a Bishop versus a Knight and that ended up making a difference in this game.

22. Rb1 Nb4 23. Kg1 Re3 24. Rf3 Re2

English Opening after 24... Re2.

English Opening after 24… Re2.

Black is trying to win one of the doubled pawns on the b file, but White is able to protect them, for now.

25. Bf1 Rd2 26. Rf2 Rxf2 27. Kxf2 Rd8

English Opening after 27... Rd8.

English Opening after 27… Rd8.

Black has placed his Rook on an open file and is still trying to win one of White’s queenside pawns. White now needs to prevent the Black Rook from infiltrating his position.

28. Ke3 Nc2+ 29. Ke4 Rd2!

English Opening after 29... Rd2!

English Opening after 29… Rd2!

Black has succeeded in penetrating White’s position, but it doesn’t do much good. White manages to hold onto his material for a few more moves.

30. h4 Rd4+ 31. Kf3 Nb4 32. Be2 h5 33. Rd1

English Opening after 33. Rd1.

English Opening after 33. Rd1.

White has now managed to get his Rook on a more active square and also to trade rooks. After the rook exchange White will then proceed to trade off the kingside pawns.

Rxd1 34. Bxd1 Kf7 35. Ke4 Kf6 36. g4 hxg4 37. Bxg4 b6 38. Kd4 c5+ 39. Ke4 Nc6

English Opening after 39... Nc6.

English Opening after 39… Nc6.

Black now starts a maneuver that will net one of the doubled pawns on the Queenside. Fortunately for White, this doesn’t hurt much.

40. h5 Na5 41. hxg6 Nxb3 42. Kd5 Na5 43. Bd1 Kxg6

English Opening after 43... Kxg6.

English Opening after 43… Kxg6.

Black is now up a pawn and starts a race with White to see who can capture the queenside pawns first. Black miscalculates and loses this race.

44. b3 Kf6 45. Kd6 Kf5 46. Kc7 Ke4 47. Kb8

English Opening after 47. Kb8.

English Opening after 47. Kb8.

Here is where Black made his fatal miscalculation. Even though he is up a pawn now, he ends up down a passed pawn that he cannot catch or stop from queening. Better might have been to play 47… a6 followed by 48… b5.

Kd4?? 48. Kxa7 Kc3 49. Kxb6 Nxb3 50. Bxb3 Kxb3 51. Kxc5 Ka4

English Opening after 51... Ka4.

English Opening after 51… Ka4.

It is White’s turn to move here and thus Black cannot catch the passed pawn. If it was Black’s turn to move here he would still be lost.

52. Kc6 Ka5 53. c5 Ka6 54. Kc7 Ka7 55. c6 Ka8 56. Kc8 Ka7 57. c7 Ka8 58. Kd8 Kb7 59. c8=Q+ 1-0

English Opening after 59. c8=Q+ (Final position).

English Opening after 59. c8=Q+ (Final position).

White is now up a Queen and does know how to checkmate from here so Black resigned.

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