Welcome to my English Opening (ECO A17) game with Nosferatu1 page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the English Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams.

[Event "ICC 60 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2005.04.05"]
[Round "1"]
[White "OnGoldenPawn"]
[Black "Nosferatu1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ICCResult "White resigns"]
[WhiteElo "1516"]
[BlackElo "1872"]
[Opening "English opening"]
[ECO "A17"]
[NIC "EO.64"]
[Time "20:11:18"]
[TimeControl "3600+0"]

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. d3 d5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. d4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Bg5 Be7 8.
e3 c4 9. b3 Bb4 10. Qc2 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. bxc4 dxc4 13. Bxc4 O-O 14. O-O
Bf5 15. Bd3 Bg4 16. Nd5 Qd6 17. Be4 Ba5 18. Rab1 Rab8 19. Rfc1 Be6 20. Qc5
Qd8 21. a3 f5 22. Ne7+ Qxe7 23. Qxe7 Nxe7 24. Bxb7 f4 25. e4 Bg4 26. d5 Bxf3
27. gxf3 Bb6 28. Ba6 Ng6 29. Kf1 Ne5 30. Ke2 Kf7 31. a4 Ke7 32. Bb5 Kd6 33.
Rb2 Bd4 34. Rbc2 Bb6 35. Bc6 Rf6 36. Bb5 Rg6 37. Rc8 Rb7 38. Ba6 Re7 39. Rf8
Rg2 40. Rxf4 Rxf2+ 41. Kd1 Rxh2 42. Be2 Be3 {White resigns} 0-1

Online Chess Game
ICC
Game Played 5 Apr 2005

White: Mike Serovey (1516) Black: Nosferatu1 (1872)

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. d3 d5

English Opening after 3... d5.

English Opening after 3… d5.

This position has given me some trouble as White. I usually capture here because I don’t like the Knight being forced to move after Black pushes the d pawn to d4. However, playing 4.g3 and then if Black plays  4…d4 White can play 5.Nb1 and then transpose into a reversed Benoni. My database of games does not show anyone rated over 2200 playing the White side of this position.

4. cxd5 exd5

English Opening after 4...exd5.

English Opening after 4…exd5.

I didn’t like any of my choices here. Playing the pawn to d4 wasted a tempo and allowing Black to play the pawn to d4 forces the Queen Knight to move twice which also wastes a tempo. Playing 5.e3 may have been best for White here.

5. d4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Bg5 Be7 8. e3 c4

English Opening after 8...c4.

English Opening after 8…c4.

Here Black has blocked up the Center and White tries to get some play and space on the Queenside. White could continue by playing the King’s Bishop to e2 and castling but instead chose to open things up on the Queenside.

9. b3 Bb4 10. Qc2 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. bxc4 dxc4

English Opening after 12...dxc4.

English Opening after 12…dxc4.

Now White has a passed pawn in the Center and Black has a passed pawn on the Queenside, which White promptly captures. Note that 12 moves into the game neither side has castled!

13. Bxc4 O-O 14. O-O Bf5

English Opening after 14...Bf5.

English Opening after 14…Bf5.

Here 15.Qb3 is better than 15.Bd3 because 15.Qb3 puts more pressure on f7 and on the Black pawn on b7. Also, with the Queen on b3 White can then play Nd5 putting more pressure on the Bishop at b4.

15. Bd3 Bg4 16. Nd5 Qd6 17. Be4 Ba5

English Opening after 17...Ba5.

English Opening after 17…Ba5.

Here White completes his development by playing his rooks to b1 and c1. Another idea is to play 18. Nf4 and trade the light-squared Bishop for the Black Knight at c6 thus creating an isolated pawn on the c file. Isolated pawns are often targets in the middle game and endgame.

18. Rab1 Rab8 19. Rfc1 Be6 20. Qc5 (White wants to trade queens but Black declines.) Qd8 21. a3?

English Opening after 21. a3?

English Opening after 21. a3?

Here White blunders by not seeing Black’s next move. Instead of playing 21. a3? White could try 21. Nb5 offering to exchange minor pieces. At this point White is still up the passed pawn in the Center. 22. Ne7+ works if White does not have any other pieces hanging.

f5! 22. Ne7+ Qxe7 23. Qxe7 Nxe7 24. Bxb7 f4

English Opening after 24...f4.

English Opening after 24…f4.

Now White is down 2 pawns for a Bishop but still has a passed pawn in the Center. White advances his connected passed pawns in the Center but still manages to lose.

25. e4 Bg4 26. d5 Bxf3 27. gxf3 Bb6

English Opening after 27...Bb6.

English Opening after 27…Bb6.

White is still down material but has the connected passed pawns in the Center. White decides to avoid trading his Bishop for the Knight because he is down material. Here Black starts a Kingside attack the prevents White from queening his pawns.

28. Ba6 Ng6 29. Kf1 Ne5 30. Ke2

English Opening after 30.Ke2.

English Opening after 30.Ke2.

Here 30. Be2 is better because the King is needed to defend the Kingside pawns. Normally. moving the King into the Center is what you should do in most endgames. Here it is premature.

Kf7 31. a4 Ke7 32. Bb5 Kd6 33. Rb2 Bd4 34. Rbc2 Bb6 35. Bc6 Rf6 36. Bb5 Rg6 37. Rc8 Rb7 38. Ba6 Re7

English Opening after 38... Re7.

English Opening after 38… Re7.

White has been trying to trade rooks and then advance his passed pawns. Black declines the trades because the rooks are needed for the Kingside attack he is planning.

39. Rf8 Rg2 40. Rxf4 Rxf2+ 41. Kd1 Rxh2 42. Be2?? Be3!!  0-1

English Opening after 42... Be3!! (Final position).

English Opening after 42… Be3!! (Final position).

Instead of 42. Be2?? losing a Rook outright, White could have played 42. Rc3 preventing 42… Be3. and protecting the pawn on f3. After the game was over Nosferatu1 sent me a message saying that he felt lucky to win this game. I still feel a little embarrassed about what I missed in this game.

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