Welcome to my English Opening (ECO A10) game with naj-rsc page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the English Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. This was a game played at ICC. Black’s strategy in this game is one that I don’t normally see when I play the English Opening. I am sure there are improvements that can be made in the way that I played this game.

[Event “ICC correspondence 2004SC18QF.06.07”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2004.04.18”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “naj-rsc”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ICCResult “White resigns”]
[Opening “English opening”]
[ECO “A10”]
[NIC “EO.22”]
[Time “13:46:48”]

1. c4 d6 2. Nc3 e5 3. e4 Nf6 4. d3 Nc6 5. g3 Bg4 6. f3 Be6 7. Bg2 g6 8. Nge2
Bg7 9. O-O Nd4 10. Nxd4 exd4 11. Ne2 c5 12. Bd2 O-O 13. b4 Nd7 14. f4 f5 15.
b5 fxe4 16. Bxe4 Qc7 17. a4 Nf6 18. Bg2 Rae8 19. a5 d5 20. cxd5 Nxd5 21. a6
b6 22. Bxd5 Bxd5 23. g4 Qd7 24. Ng3 Qxb5 25. Qb1 Qxb1 26. Raxb1 Be6 27. f5
Bc8 28. Ra1 gxf5 29. Nxf5 Bxf5 30. gxf5 Re5 {White resigns} 0-1


Online Chess Game
ICC
Game Played 18 April 2004 to ? 2004
White: Mike Serovey Black
: naj-rsc

1. c4 d6 2. Nc3 e5 3. e4 Nf6 4. d3 Nc6 5. g3 Bg4

English Opening after 5... Bg4.

English Opening after 5… Bg4.

I have seen this early Bg4 quite often in this opening which is what prompted me to change my move order for this opening. If 6. Nge2 then 6… Bf3 7. Rg1 and White cannot castle kingside. Playing 6. f3 seems to be the only logical move here even though the pawn will later move to f4.

6. f3 Be6 7. Bg2 g6 8. Nge2 Bg7 9. O-O Nd4

English Opening after 9... Nd4.

English Opening after 9… Nd4.

Another move that I have seen quite often lately is Nd4. Although capturing the Knight on d4 does double Black’s pawns, it might be better to play 10. Bd3, 10. h3 followed by 11. f4, or 10. Nd5 as all of the above would be more consistent with White’s strategy.

10. Nxd4 exd4 11. Ne2 c5 12. Bd2 O-O 13. b4 Nd7 14. f4 f5

English Opening after 14... f5.

English Opening after 14… f5.

I often see f5 when Black also has a pawn on e5. If both players are attacking on the Kingside White usually gets an advantage. Although attacking on the Queenside is consistent with the English opening it is not consistent with how USCF Life Master Tom Stiers taught me to play this opening. Tom told me to ignore the Queenside and to attack on the Kingside. In this game my strategy was to try to undermine Black’s central pawns but I changed my mind when I played 15. b5. Capturing on c5 would undouble Black’s pawns and capturing on f5 would allow Black to get a Bishop on White’s pawn at d3. Worth considering is 15. bxc5 dxc5 16. e5 creating a passed pawn on the e file and attacking the Black pawn at b7 with the Bishop at g2.

15. b5 fxe4 16. Bxe4 Qc7 17. a4 Nf6

English Opening after 17... Nf6.

English Opening after 17… Nf6.

White has gotten away from his original plan of attacking on the Kingside and is now attacking on the Queenside. Black now opens up the Center and gets an advantage from doing this.

18. Bg2 Rae8 19. a5 d5 20. cxd5 Nxd5 21. a6 b6

English Opening after 21... b6.

English Opening after 21… b6.

Although the material is even Black has a positional advantage. He has an unbroken pawn chain from a7 to d4 and both bishops aimed at the Queenside. White’s minor pieces are not as well coordinated and White has an isolated pawn at d3 and a backwards pawn at b5. Both became targets that Black attacked. White now captured the Black Knight at d5 in  order to prevent it from going to c3. However, this capture put the Black Bishop on a very powerful diagonal.

22. Bxd5 Bxd5 23. g4? Qd7!

English Opening after 23... Qd7!

English Opening after 23… Qd7!

Black’s last move attacks both the pawn at b7 and the one at g4. White cannot save both of them and thus loses a pawn.

24. Ng3 Qxb5 25. Qb1 Qxb1 26. Raxb1 Be6 27. f5 Bc8 28. Ra1 gxf5 29. Nxf5 Bxf5 30. gxf5 Re5 0-1

English Opening after 30... Re5 (Final position).

English Opening after 30… Re5 (Final position).

White cannot save his f pawn and thus resigned rather than play out the endgame two pawns down.

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