Welcome to my English Opening (ECO A16) game with jonesey page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the English Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. The ratings listed below are for each player at the conclusion of this game.

[Event “ICC correspondence 2007Seven.02.15”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2007.08.25”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “jonesey”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ICCResult “White resigns”]
[Opening “English: symmetrical, Rubinstein system”]
[ECO “A16”]
[NIC “EO.36”]
[Time “18:02:53”]

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. cxd5 Nxd5 4. g3 c5 5. Bg2 Nc7 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. O-O e5 8.
d3 Be7 9. Be3 O-O 10. Na4 b6 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Bxa8 Nxa8 13. d4 Ng4 14. dxc5
Nxe3 15. fxe3 Qe8 16. cxb6 Bg5 17. bxa7 Qxe3+ 18. Rf2 Rd8 19. Qc2 Qxa7 20.
Kf1 Bh3+ 21. Rg2 Qb7 22. e4 Rd2 {White resigns} 0-1


Online Chess Game
ICC
Game Played 25 August 2007 to 15 September 2007
White: Mike Serovey (1547) Black
: jonesey (1739)
1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. cxd5 Nxd5

English Opening after 3... Nxd5.

English Opening after 3… Nxd5.

The 3 most typical moves for white here are Nf3, e4 and g3. I chose the last one because it is the closest to my style of play.

4. g3 c5

English Opening after 4... c5.

English Opening after 4… c5.

I have a database of games in which this opening was played and I could not find this position anywhere in it! Black usually plays Nxc3 or g6 here. I did find a game in which c6 was played and one with e6. Because I have never seen this position before and had no grandmaster game to follow I decided to go for simple development and see what happened from there.

5. Bg2 Nc7 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. O-O e5 8. d3 Be7 9. Be3 O-O

English Opening after 9... 0-0.

English Opening after 9… 0-0.

At this point in the game White has a slight lead in development because Black his moved his Knight 3 times. However, I wasn’t sure how to proceed from here. After some thought I decided to attack the pawn at c5 in order to get Black to play b6. When I first looked at sacrificing my Knight at e5 I thought that I would win the Rook at a8 for my Knight. Then I realized that it was an even trade of a Rook and pawn for a Bishop and Knight. Because I couldn’t find a better plan I went with the exchange combination.

10. Na4 b6 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Bxa8 Nxa8

English Opening after 12... Nxa8.

English Opening after 12… Nxa8.

Black has a Knight in the corner and a Bishop that isn’t doing much. White has a Knight on the edge of the board that isn’t doing anything. Although the material is even I think that Black is slightly better here because White has a light-squared weakness around his King and that becomes critical later on in this game. Here is where I blundered away a pawn. I wanted to open this position up some so I played 13. d4? expecting a trade at d4. I was surprised when my opponent played Ng4 attacking my Bishop and winning a pawn if I move the Bishop. I thought that I could live with doubled e pawns but my Kingside was too weak as you will soon see.

13. d4? Ng4 14. dxc5? Nxe3 15. fxe3 Qe8!

English Opening after 15... Qe8!

English Opening after 15… Qe8!

Black is threatening Bg5 winning the pawn at e3. I thought that I would be OK after the Black Bishop captures on e3, but I was wrong. White’s best try to defend the pawn here is probably 16. Qd3 and then if 16… Bg5 17. e4 Bb7 and White cannot defend the pawn at e4.

16. cxb6 Bg5 17. bxa7 Qxe3+

English Opening after 17... Qxe3+

English Opening after 17… Qxe3+

I was expecting Black to capture on e3 with his Bishop and was thus surprised by the Queen taking there instead. The King is in check and any King move would be met by Bb7+ and the King is soon mated. I had no choice but to block the check with my Rook and lose the exchange when the Bishop pins it to my King and then wins it. Black’s control of the diagonals around my King is what won this game for him.

18. Rf2 Rd8 19. Qc2 Qxa7 20. Kf1 Bh3+ 21. Rg2 Qb7 22. e4 Rd2!! 0-1

English Opening after 22... Rd2!! (Final position).

English Opening after 22… Rd2!! (Final position).

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