Welcome to my English Opening game with Ed Prather page!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the English Opening.

The game includes analysis and diagrams.

[Event "ICC 20 0"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2004.07.02"]
[Round "-"]
[White "OnGoldenPawn"]
[Black "EPrather"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ICCResult "White checkmated"]
[WhiteElo "1642"]
[BlackElo "1564"]
[Opening "English: symmetrical variation"]
[ECO "A30"]
[NIC "EO.64"]
[Time "20:11:22"]
[TimeControl "1200+0"]

1. c4 c5 2. d3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. g3 d6 5. Bg2 Bf5 6. e4 Bg6 7. h3 e6 8. Nge2
Nd4 9. O-O Be7 10. Be3 Nxe2+ 11. Nxe2 O-O 12. Nf4 Nd7 13. Nxg6 fxg6 14. f4
Bf6 15. Rb1 e5 16. g4 exf4 17. Bxf4 Bd4+ 18. Kh1 Ne5 19. Bxe5 Bxe5 20. b4
Qh4 21. Rxf8+ Rxf8 22. Qg1 Bd4 23. Qe1 Bf2 24. Qe2 Bd4 25. Rf1 Rxf1+ 26.
Bxf1 Bf2 27. bxc5 Qg3 28. Bg2 Qf4 29. Qf3 Qc1+ 30. Kh2 Qg1# {White
checkmated} 0-1

Online Chess Game
ICC
Game Played 2 Jul 2004
White: Mike Serovey (1642) Black: Ed Prather  (1564)

1. c4 c5 2. d3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. g3 d6

English Opening after 4... d6.

English Opening after 4… d6.

At this point in the game we have a fairly typical English Opening that is symmetrical.

5. Bg2 Bf5 6. e4

English Opening after 6. e4.

English Opening after 6. e4.

Now White has transposed into a variation of the English that I learned from USCF Life Master Thomas G. Stiers. It is called the Botvinnik system.

Bg6 7. h3 (To prevent Ng4) e6 8. Nge2 Nd4 9. O-O Be7 10. Be3 Nxe2+

English Opening after 10... Nxe2+

English Opening after 10… Nxe2+

I’m still not sure of the correct way to recapture here.  Normally, I would want to play Nd5 at some point in the game but that is not an option here. Still, taking with the Queen might have been better.

11. Nxe2 O-O 12. Nf4

English Opening after 12. Nf4.

English Opening after 12. Nf4.

Normally, I play the Pawn to f4 here instead of the Knight. I wanted that Bishop on g6 and to double Black’s pawns around the King.

Nd7 13. Nxg6 fxg6 14. f4

English Opening after 14. f4.

English Opening after 14. f4.

Now I have the pawn structure that I wanted. White is preparing for a Kingside attack but no longer has the usual targets in this variation. The f7 square isn’t really a weakness here and there are no knights to pin to the Queen. White’s pieces are more set up for a Queenside attack.

Bf6 15. Rb1 e5 16. g4 exf4 17. Bxf4

English Opening after 17. Bxf4.

English Opening after 17. Bxf4.

White is still playing a Kingside attack even though his bishops are aimed at the Queenside.

Bd4+ 18. Kh1 Ne5 19. Bxe5 Bxe5 20. b4

English Opening after 20. b4.

English Opening after 20. b4.

White now realizes that there is no attack left on the Kingside and finally opens up the Queenside.

Qh4 (Threatens mate in two.) 21. Rxf8+ Rxf8 22. Qg1 Bd4 23. Qe1 Bf2 24. Qe2 Bd4 25. Rf1 Rxf1+ 26. Bxf1 Bf2

English Opening after 26... Bf2.

English Opening after 26… Bf2.

At first, I thought that White blundered by taking this Pawn, but it turns out that the fatal error was made on move 29.

27. bxc5 Qg3 (Threatens Qg1#) 28. Bg2 Qf4

English Opening after 28... Qf4.

English Opening after 28… Qf4.

Here White misses the combination of Qc1+ and Qg1#. Instead of 29. Qf3 White could have played 29. cxd6. If then 29… Qc1+ 30. Bf1 Bg3 31. d7 Bc7 32. d4 Qf4 33. e5! and White is winning.

29. Qf3?? Qc1+!! 30. Kh2 Qg1# 0-1

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