Welcome to my Blackmar Gambit (ECO D00) game with HoldemRulzOK!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the Blackmar Gambit.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. This game is a good example of how not to play this gambit as Black! This is one of my few wins with this opening. I had help from an ebook on this opening that is very recent. The ratings listed below are for each player at the end of the game.

[Event “ICC correspondence 2008Quad.08.08”]
[Site “Internet Chess Club”]
[Date “2008.08.10”]
[Round “-“]
[White “OnGoldenPawn”]
[Black “HoldemRulzOK”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ICCResult “Black resigns”]
[Opening “Blackmar gambit”]
[ECO “D00”]
[NIC “QP.08”]
[Time “19:53:08”]

1. d4 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. f3 exf3 5. Nxf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bh5 7. g4 Bg6 8.
Ne5 Nbd7 9. Qf3 c6 10. Nxg6 hxg6 11. g5 Nh5 12. Bc4 e6 13. Rf1 Qe7 14. Bd2
Nb6 15. Bb3 Rd8 16. Ne2 Qd7 17. O-O-O Bd6 18. c4 Bc7 19. Bb4 Ra8 20. d5 Nxc4
21. dxc6 Qxc6 {Black resigns} 1-0

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Online Correspondence Chess Game

ICC

Dates Played: 10 August 2008 to 8 October 2008
White:
Mike Serovey(1664) Black: HoldemRulzOK (1635/2)

1. d4 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. f3 exf3 5. Nxf3 Bg4

Blackmar gambit after 5... Bg4.

Blackmar gambit after 5… Bg4.

Thus begins the Blackmar-Diemer: Teichmann defense. This seems to be the most common reply and certainly the one that I have seen the     most!

6. h3 Bh5 7. g4 Bg6

Blackmar gambit after 7... Bg6.

Blackmar gambit after 7… Bg6.

White’s last 2 moves appear to weaken the Kingside pawn structure in order to break the pin at f3. However, that doesn’t matter because White castles Queenside in this line. White’s next move moves a piece twice i the opening before completing his development but is OK because it threatens to double a pawn at g6.

8. Ne5 Nbd7 9. Qf3 c6 10. Nxg6 hxg6

Blackmar gambit after 10... hxg6.

Blackmar gambit after 10… hxg6.

So far Black has been playing the expected moves. Black now has doubled pawns so that is compensation for the sacrificed pawn. Black has a Rook on a half-open file but it has few places that it can go. The Black King is blocked in by his own pieces and does not move in this game. White now forces the Knight at f6 to the edge of the board where it does not do much.

11. g5 Nh5 12. Bc4 e6 13. Rf1 Qe7

Blackmar gambit after 13... Qe7.

Blackmar gambit after 13… Qe7.

Black now has to spend the rest of this game defending f7. If he castles Queenside on his next move he will lose the pawn at f7 and end up with a White Rook on his second rank.

14. Bd2 Nb6 15. Bb3 Rd8 16. Ne2 Qd7 17. O-O-O Bd6 18. c4 Bc7 19. Bb4 Ra8

Blackmar gambit after 19... Ra8.

Blackmar gambit after 19… Ra8.

While competing his own development White has prevented Black from castling to either side of the board. White’s next move tries to open up the Center but Black freaks out and sacrifices a knight. I was going to take it at first and then realized that a double attack on the Black Queen was better. This is when Black left f7 unguarded and resigned.

20. d5 Nxc4 21. dxc6 Qxc6?? 1-0

Blackmar gambit after 21... Qxc6?? (Final position).

Blackmar gambit after 21… Qxc6?? (Final position).

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