Welcome to my Blackmar-Diemer Gambit (ECO D00, Teichmann defense) game with Lawrence D. Gladding!

On this page I have posted one my chess games in which I played the White side of the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit.

The game includes analysis and diagrams. My opponent had a USCF OTB rating of 1810 at the time we started this game.  This game is a good example of how not to play this gambit as White!

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Correspondence Chess Game
Section: 96RT25
Dates Played: 28 October 1996 to ?
White:
Mike Serovey(1915) Black: Lawrence D. Gladding (1738)

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. e4 dxe4 4. f3 exf3

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 4... exf3.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 4… exf3.

White has 3 ways to recapture here. I believe that the best way is with 5. Nxf3 because it is the only one that protects the d pawn and also develops a piece. I recently posted a YouTube video on another page in which the presenter shows a trap after 5. Qxf5 Qxd4. Check it out.

5. Nxf3 Bg4 6. Be3 e6 7. Bd3 Bb4

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 7... Bb4.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 7… Bb4.

Black has developed both of his bishops to squares that pin both White knights. Those pins caused problems for White later on in the game.

8. O-O O-O 9. Qe1 Nbd7 10. Qh4 Be7 11. Bxh7+!

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 11. Bxh7+!

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 11. Bxh7+!

White’s last move wins back the gambit pawn and weakens the pawn structure around the Black King. Unfortunately, White was not able to capitalize on this.

Nxh7 12. Qxg4 f5 13. Qg3 g5

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 13... g5.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 13… g5.

Black is advancing his kingside pawns which leaves his own King’s position a little vulnerable. White is not worried about f4 because after Bxf4 the Black g pawn is pinned to the King and thus cannot recapture on f4. After 14. h4 taking advantage of the pinned g pawn Black can play g4 attacking the White Knight at f3 and the h pawn. White would be better moving the Knight on f3 first and then playing h4.

14. Ne5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Qe8

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 15... Qe8.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 15… Qe8.

Now h4 followed by Qh2 works. I have no idea why I played my next move as White.

16. Ne2 Kh8 17. Bf2 c5 18. Be1 b6 19. Bc3 Qb5 20. Nc1 Kg7

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 20... Kg7.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 20… Kg7.

I don’t know why Black moved his King back to g7. Perhaps he is trying to bait me into playing h4, which is OK for White.

21. a4 Qe8 22. b3 Qh5

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 22... Qh5.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 22… Qh5.

Black is now preparing for the final kingside attack that ends up winning this game for him.

23. Nd3 Kh8 24. Rf3 Rac8 25. Nb2 g4 26. Rd3 Rcd8 27. Rad1 f4 28. Qf2 Rxd3 29. Rxd3 Ng5

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 29... Ng5.

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 29… Ng5.

The White Rook at d3 controls the d file and helps to protect White’s third rank. Black allows the White Rook to go to d7 because his kingside attack keeps White too busy to cause any trouble with that Rook.

30. Rd7 Ne4 31. Qe1 f3!

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 31... f3!

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 31… f3!

If White plays 32. Qxe4 then Black still plays 32… f2+ forcing 33. Kf1 allowing 33… Qxh2 followed by Qg1#.

32. Nd1 fxg2 33. Kxg2 Qh3+

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 33... Qh3+

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 33… Qh3+

Here 34. Kh1 is not any better than 34. Kg1 because 34… g3 takes advantage of the pinned h pawn.

34. Kg1 Bh4 35. Qe2 Nxc3 36. Nxc3 Bf2+ 37. Kh1 Bd4!! 0-1

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 37... Bd4!! (Final position).

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit after 37… Bd4!! (Final position).

White has no defense against Rf1+ winning the White Queen with checkmate.

Mike Serovey, MA, MISM

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